MADAM SATAN
1930, Warner Bros., 116 min, USA, Dir: Cecil B. DeMille

This delightfully bizarre mélange of song, dance, bedroom farce and airship disaster - director Cecil B. DeMille’s only movie musical - must be seen to be believed. Angela Brooks (Kay Johnson) endures the infidelity of husband Bob (Reginald Denny) until a masquerade ball offers her the opportunity to win back her straying spouse and put the man’s mistress (Lillian Roth) in her place. A pre-Code gem whose sets, production numbers and costumes (by designer Adrian) will leave you slack-jawed!


CABARET
1972, Warner Bros., 123 min, USA, Dir: Bob Fosse

In decadent 1930s Berlin, impulsive and morally liberal agent provocateur Sally Bowles (Liza Minnelli) meets the scholarly and handsome Bryan (Michael York) and the two develop an intimate relationship while unknowingly sharing a bisexual lover. Winner of eight Oscars, including Best Director, Actress and Supporting Actor (Joel Grey, as the Kit Kat Klub's reptilian Master of Ceremonies).


42ND STREET
1933, Warner Bros., 89 min, USA, Dir: Lloyd Bacon

An aging Broadway director puts on one last show and ably handles constant complications - including a last-minute replacement when the star of his production breaks her ankle. The most famous of the Warner Bros. musicals is also one of the fastest and funniest, thanks to expert work by Ginger Rogers and a plethora of Warner’s contract players. Optimistic and sexy yet sharply aware of the Depression's ravages, this beautifully choreographed - by Busby Berkeley - classic influenced later films from ALL THAT JAZZ to BOOGIE NIGHTS. With Dick Powell and Ruby Keeler.


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