KISS ME KATE
1953, Warner Bros., 109 min, USA, Dir: George Sidney

This adaptation of the Broadway hit is often cited as one of the best 3-D films of the 1950s. As divorced actors reuniting for a musical production of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew, Kathryn Grayson and Howard Keel get to sing some "wunderbar" Cole Porter songs, along with the great Ann Miller (“Too Darn Hot”). As you’d expect of a Golden Age MGM musical, the dancing is as marvelous as the Oscar-nominated score, with choreography by Hermes Pan (and ace hoofer/future director Bob Fosse in the role of Hortensio).


CURLY TOP
1935, 20th Century Fox, 75 min, USA, Dir: Irving Cummings

Elizabeth (Shirley Temple) is a spunky orphan whose talent for singing catches the attention of Edward (John Boles), a wealthy young attorney who decides to adopt the young upstart. When her older sister Mary (Rochelle Hudson) explains that she promised her parents she and Elizabeth would never be separated, Edward arranges for both of them to move to his estate. Complications arise when he and another young man both fall for the older sister and Elizabeth steps in to play cupid. Musical highlights include Shirley singing “Animal Crackers In My Soup.”


HELLO, DOLLY!
1969, 20th Century Fox, 146 min, USA, Dir: Gene Kelly

This irresistible film adaptation - from one of Jerry Herman’s finest musicals - features the fabulous Barbra Streisand in a kick-out-the-jams performance as matchmaker Dolly Levi, furiously working to make marriages while trying to snag bachelor Walter Matthau for herself. Staged with gusto by dancing legend-turned-director Gene Kelly, and featuring a wonderful supporting cast including Tommy Tune, Michael Crawford and jazz legend Louis Armstrong (whose version of the title song is itself worth the price of admission!).


Syndicate content