LET THE PEOPLE SING
2011, 90 min, Ireland, Dir: Gary Kenneally and Paddy Kenneally

The members of the legendary Irish folk group The Wolfe Tones - Tommy Byrne, Noel Nagle, and Brian Warfield - have been performing together for 49 years, but their story has never been told with as much intimacy and power as in this new documentary. Filmmakers Gary and Paddy Kenneally trace the group's history from its humble working class beginnings to worldwide fame, combining decades of archival clips with new footage shot over the last three years. The result is a gritty, candid, and powerful portrait of three men and their music.


HUNGARIAN RHAPSODY: QUEEN LIVE IN BUDAPEST ’86
2012, D&E Entertainment, 115 min, USA,

On July 27, 1986, Queen performed the largest-ever stadium concert at the Nepstadium in Budapest to a crowd of 80,000 ecstatic fans. The concert was part of the famed “Magic Tour,” the last time the band toured with lead singer Freddie Mercury. This original concert film has been remastered in high definition and features many of Queen’s best-loved tracks, including “Bohemian Rhapsody,” “Crazy Little Thing Called Love,” “I Want to Break Free” and “We Are the Champions.”


AMY
1998, Cascade Films, 104 min, Australia, Dir: Nadia Tass

Traumatized by the death of her rock star father, 8-year-old Amy (a remarkable Alana De Roma) has become mute. When her mother (Rachel Griffiths) brings her to Melbourne in search of treatment, they move in with some quirky locals, one of whom (Ben Mendelsohn) tries to use music to bring the little girl out of her world of silence. A touching mix of comedy, drama and song, AMY won nearly 30 international awards, including the Grand Prix Cannes Junior at the Cannes Film Festival.


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