A MIGHTY WIND
2003, Warner Bros., 91 min, USA, Dir: Christopher Guest

This uniquely touching mockumentary reunites the team from BEST IN SHOW and WAITING FOR GUFFMAN to tell the story of three folk groups from the '60s who, inspired by the death of their former manager, reunite for a memorial concert in New York City’s Town Hall. Eugene Levy and Catherine O’Hara are Mitch and Mickey, once the sweethearts of folk music until their bitter separation; Spinal Tap alumni Christopher Guest, Michael McKean and Harry Shearer are classic folk trio The Folksmen; and Parker Posey, John Michael Higgins and Jane Lynch anchor a color-coordinated, harmonizing “neuftet” - The New Main Street Singers.


F.T.A.
1972, 96 min, USA, Dir: Francine Parker

Produced by Jane Fonda and Donald Sutherland, F.T.A. is a witty and moving film that chronicles opposition to the Vietnam War. Fonda and Sutherland, along with Holly Near, Michael Alaimo, Rita Martinson and Len Chandler, entertained American troops with a satirical revue called (in the polite version) “Free the Army.” The original theatrical release was curtailed under somewhat mysterious circumstances so the film was never widely seen and reemerges now as an essential piece of cinema and social history.


THE BLUE ANGEL
DER BLAUE ENGEL
1930, Kino Lorber, 106 min, Germany, Dir: Josef Von Sternberg

Emil Jannings is the repressed professor who falls head-over-heels for bawdy cabaret chanteuse Lola-Lola (Marlene Dietrich). It’s a liaison that will jumpstart the engine of his self-destruction, immolating both his private and public life till only ashes are left. The classic that scandalized international audiences and started the collaboration between Von Sternberg and Dietrich, setting the tone for the characters and motifs found in their subsequent efforts together.


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