THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA (1989)
1989, Park Circus/MGM, 95 min, USA/UK/Hungary, Dir: Dwight H. Little

“Only love and music are forever.” NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET star Robert Englund dons the phantom’s mask for a big-screen adaptation of the famed Gaston Leroux novel that hews closer to the horror of the original than the romance of the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical. An accident during an audition transports 1980s Juilliard student Christine Day (Jill Schoelen) back to 19th-century London, where a horribly disfigured antihero who haunts an aging opera house becomes infatuated with her. With Alex Hyde-White, Bill Nighy and Molly Shannon (in her film debut).


THE HOURS AND TIMES
1991, Oscilloscope Laboratories, 57 min, USA, Dir: Christopher Munch

Christopher Munch’s boldly original debut is a fictional account of what might have happened in April 1963, when John Lennon and Beatles manager Brian Epstein traveled to Barcelona for an extended weekend getaway. In the four days they spend together, the suave Epstein (David Angus) and the provocative Lennon (Ian Hart, in his first starring role) reflect on their lives, both private and professional, as they explore the unique bond they share. Munch’s sparse and intimate narrative, captured with exquisite black-and-white cinematography, is a thoughtful meditation on friendship and sexuality, crafted around a brief moment in the lives of two extremely well-known pop figures.


BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY
2018, 20th Century Fox, 132 min, UK/USA, Dir: Bryan Singer

This enthralling celebration of Queen and their music follows the band’s extraordinary lead singer, Freddie Mercury (Golden Globe Best Actor Rami Malek), who defied stereotypes and convention to become one of history’s most beloved entertainers. Following Queen’s meteoric rise, their revolutionary sound and Freddie’s solo career, the film also chronicles the band’s reunion, and one of the greatest performances in rock history.


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