F.T.A.
1972, 96 min, USA, Dir: Francine Parker

Produced by Jane Fonda and Donald Sutherland, F.T.A. is a witty and moving film that chronicles opposition to the Vietnam War. Fonda and Sutherland, along with Holly Near, Michael Alaimo, Rita Martinson and Len Chandler, entertained American troops with a satirical revue called (in the polite version) “Free the Army.” The original theatrical release was curtailed under somewhat mysterious circumstances so the film was never widely seen and reemerges now as an essential piece of cinema and social history.


THE BLUE ANGEL
DER BLAUE ENGEL
1930, Kino Lorber, 106 min, Germany, Dir: Josef Von Sternberg

Emil Jannings is the repressed professor who falls head-over-heels for bawdy cabaret chanteuse Lola-Lola (Marlene Dietrich). It’s a liaison that will jumpstart the engine of his self-destruction, immolating both his private and public life till only ashes are left. The classic that scandalized international audiences and started the collaboration between Von Sternberg and Dietrich, setting the tone for the characters and motifs found in their subsequent efforts together.


HER SMELL
2018, Gunpowder & Sky, 134 min, USA/Greece, Dir: Alex Ross Perry

Becky Something (Elisabeth Moss, in a towering, unflinching performance) is a '90s punk-rock superstar who once filled arenas with her grungy all-female trio Something She. Now she plays smaller venues while grappling with motherhood, exhausted bandmates, nervous record company executives and a new generation of rising talent eager to usurp her stardom. When Becky's chaos and excesses derail a recording session and national tour, she finds herself shunned, isolated and alone. Forced to get sober, temper her demons and reckon with the past, she retreats from the spotlight and tries to recapture the creative inspiration that led her band to success.


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