INFERNO (1980)
1980, 20th Century Fox, 106 min, Italy, Dir: Dario Argento

Originally unreleased in the U.S., this was the second part of a never-finished trilogy (with SUSPIRIA) about the Three Mothers, who rule the world with "sorrow, darkness and tears." Here, Argento delights in the orchestration of elements -- bloody hands on curtains, dusty volumes of arcane knowledge -- transforming INFERNO’s apartment building into a demonic theatrical tableaux. “Argento’s world is a lushly horrific one, painted with broad stripes of lurid color, housed in labyrinthian mansions and peopled by beings whose senses quiver and tense at the evils ordinary humans can’t perceive.” - Hazel-Dawn Dumpert, L.A. Weekly.


THEY LIVE
1988, Universal, 87 min, USA, Dir: John Carpenter

Construction worker Roddy Piper learns that the world has been taken over by grinning skull-headed aliens who are permeating society with subliminal messages to mindlessly consume (sound like some corporations you know?). Glimpsing the truth with the aid of special sunglasses that strip away the phony layers of manufactured reality, he and fellow drifter Keith David join the underground to rebel against the mind control in this searingly satirical sci-fi jaunt, one of Carpenter’s best and wildest films. Co-starring Meg Foster.


SPLIT
2016, Universal, 117 min, Dir: M. Night Shyamalan

Writer-director-producer M. Night Shyamalan returns with an original thriller that delves into the mysterious recesses of one man's fractured, gifted mind. Though Kevin (James McAvoy) has evidenced 23 personalities to his trusted psychiatrist, Dr. Fletcher (Betty Buckley), there remains one still submerged who is set to materialize and dominate all the others. Compelled to abduct three teenage girls led by the willful, observant Casey (THE WITCH’s Anya Taylor-Joy), Kevin reaches a war for survival among all of those contained within him - as well as everyone around him - as the walls between his compartments shatter apart.


Syndicate content