REPULSION
1965, Sony Repertory, 104 min, Dir: Roman Polanski

Director Roman Polanski’s second film was his first shot in English and certifiable proof that he was the new wunderkind of the psychological suspense thriller, favoring a warped psychology and metaphysical anguish, as well as dark Bunuelian humor. Here, beautician Catherine Deneuve, pathologically revolted by men, goes off the deep end when her loving but worldly sister (Yvonne Furneaux) leaves for the weekend with her boyfriend (Ian Hendry). The men that interact with Deneuve over the ensuing hours - smitten young John Fraser and lecherous landlord Patrick Wymark - don’t have any idea what they’re in for. Still retains an astonishing wallop and remains one of Polanski’s most intense portraits of irrational fears triumphing in a climax of abject terror.


SANTA SANGRE
1989, Severin Films, 121 min, Italy/Mexico, Dir: Alejandro Jodorowsky

Combining elements at once beautiful, grotesque and erotic, SANTA SANGRE is something akin to Fellini remaking both PSYCHO and NIGHTMARE ALLEY as one single, glorious fever dream of a thriller. If you haven’t seen it, do not miss out!


THE MEPHISTO WALTZ
1971, 20th Century Fox, 109 min, USA, Dir: Paul Wendkos

One of the most stylish horror films ever made. Music journalist Alan Alda finds himself in the clutches of a satanic cult after interviewing an unnaturally gifted concert pianist (Curt Jurgens). Jacqueline Bisset, Barbara Parkins and Bradford Dillman co-star in this truly chilling drug-induced nightmare of a movie featuring composer Jerry Goldsmith's frightening adaptation of Liszt’s "Mephisto Waltz."


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