PSYCHO
1960, Universal, 109 min, USA, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

Coming off the comparatively big-budget NORTH BY NORTHWEST, director Alfred Hitchcock decided he wanted to make a nice little, low-budget, black-and-white film for a change of pace. This was the result, and the shock waves are still reverberating. Lovely embezzler Marion Crane (Janet Leigh) takes refuge from a rainstorm off the beaten track on a lonely California highway. Unfortunately, she checks in at the Bates Motel, presided over by young Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins), a strange fellow living with his mother in a nearby mansion. Hitchcock used the small crew from his popular TV show for this hair-raising example of California Gothic, and it remains one of the most influential chillers ever made. With Vera Miles and John Gavin.


FRIGHT NIGHT
1985, Sony Repertory, 106 min, USA, Dir: Tom Holland

In this vampire favorite, Tom Holland creates a blend of true creepiness and ’80s horror movie fun. After seeing a coffin carried into the house next door, young Charley Brewster believes his neighbor (Chris Sarandon) is a vampire. Desperate to convince anyone, he enlists Roddy McDowall, who steals the show as the television vampire hunter who is truly a coward. Great visual effects by Richard Edlund.


CHILD'S PLAY
1988, MGM Repertory, 87 min, Dir: Tom Holland

“Andy Barclay has a new playmate who’s in no mood to play.” Young Andy Barclay is thrilled to get the hottest new toy - until he learns his doll is possessed by the spirit of a psychotic criminal! Can Andy convince the adults in his life that “Chucky” (voiced by an exceptionally creepy Brad Dourif) is out to get him before it’s too late? Chris Sarandon and Catherine Hicks star in this horror classic, which spawned an entire Chucky franchise, and which does double duty as a shrewd satire on consumerism and its effect on children.


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