MINISTRY OF FEAR
1944, Universal, 86 min, USA, Dir: Fritz Lang

Ray Milland plays a Londoner traumatized by his wife’s murder who’s released after two years in an asylum - and walks straight into a network of Nazi spies trying to undermine the British war effort. But who’ll believe the warnings of a crazy person? Taking full advantage of the brilliant artifice of the Paramount art department, Lang spins a dizzying tale of alienation and espionage that’s more fun than any wartime thriller has a right to be. Based on the novel by Graham Greene, and featuring delicious supporting turns from Hillary Brooke and Dan Duryea.


QUIET PLEASE, MURDER
1942, 20th Century Fox, 70 min, USA, Dir: John Francis Larkin

George Sanders is at his arrogant best as a master forger who steals a priceless Shakespeare folio while teaming up with femme fatale Gail Jackson. The scene of the crime: the Los Angeles Public Library! An example of the Fox B-unit at its best! Also starring Richard Denning.


LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN
1946, 20th Century Fox, 111 min, USA, Dir: John Stahl

Exhibit A in the argument that film noir isn't always black-and-white. Don't let the stunningly lush Technicolor fool you - this big-budget soap opera has the blackest of hearts and is as perverse and malignant as it got in the ’40s. Novelist Cornel Wilde falls for gorgeous Gene Tierney but has no idea of the darkness lurking behind those emerald eyes. A rare chance to see Leon Shamroy's Oscar-winning cinematography on the big screen.


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