THE ASPHALT JUNGLE
1950, Warner Brothers, 112 min, Dir: John Huston

The kingpin of caper films, featuring one of the best ensemble casts ever. Director John Huston's neo-realist adaptation of W. R. Burnett’s novel examines the ambitions of small-time hoods and brought a new level of empathy and authenticity to crime - that "left-handed form of human endeavor." Famous as the film that introduced Marilyn Monroe, THE ASPHALT JUNGLE deserves renewed recognition as a crucial work of noir Americana. With Sterling Hayden, Louis Calhern, James Whitmore and Jean Hagen.


HE RAN ALL THE WAY
1951, Park Circus/MGM, 78 min, USA, Dir: John Berry

John Garfield's final film role, and one of his best. He talks a young woman (Shelley Winters) into inviting him home for dinner - but he takes her family hostage once they realize he's wanted for a cop-killing. The daughter falls for him anyway, seeing a kindred spirit who only wants to escape tenement life. Taut and claustrophobic, with superb performances and bold cinematography by James Wong Howe.


THE LOCKET
1946, Warner Bros., 85 min, USA, Dir: John Brahm

On his wedding day, a groom (Brian Aherne) is told stunning tales regarding the troubled past of his bride-to-be (Laraine Day), including her destructive affair with a tortured artist (Robert Mitchum). This dazzling and dizzying psychodrama uses a web of interlocking flashbacks to show how a woman’s childhood obsession with a prized locket dictates the course of her life.


Syndicate content