THE PROWLER
1951, Crystal Pictures, 92 min, USA, Dir: Joseph Losey

A perverse, provocative film about a corrupt cop (Van Heflin) who sexually dominates a married woman (Evelyn Keyes) for material gain. Oh yeah, he murders her husband in the process - then marries her. And she ends up giving birth in a Nevada ghost town. Hands down, Keyes’ best performance. Heflin’s desperate pursuit of his skewed vision of the American Dream lingers in the memory – potent, haunting and disturbingly similar to today’s headline news. A rediscovered masterpiece not to be missed!


JEALOUSY
1945, Republic, 71 min, USA, Dir: Gustav Machatý

A perky female cabbie (Jane Randolph) gets embroiled in a dangerous triangle involving her suicidal writer husband (Nils Asther) and an aloof, high-toned doctor (John Loder) who takes a shine to her. Director Machatý, known for the scandalous 1933 ECSTASY, concocts a dreamy, off-kilter tale that touches all the tropes of “B” passion plays while also depicting the displacement of European artists adrift in sunbaked Hollywood. Part bargain-basement loopiness, part experimental art film ... and, not surprisingly, the last film the artistically inclined Machatý made in America. Featuring Karen Morley (at her best!) and Hugo Haas.


THE SCARLET HOUR
1956, Paramount, 95 min, USA, Dir: Michael Curtiz

Nearing the end of his legendary career, Michael Curtiz produced and directed this intricately plotted L.A.-based crime thriller headed by a cast of new discoveries. A tony seductress (Carol Ohmart) and her lover (Tom Tryon) overhear plans for a jewel robbery, and believe the scheme will be their deliverance from Ohmart’s possessive husband (James Gregory). Highlights include a guest appearance by Nat King Cole singing “Never Let Me Go” in the Crystal Room of the Beverly Hills Hotel. Culled from the Paramount vault, this 35mm print remains one of the least seen film noirs of the 1950s, featuring Curtiz’s use of the then-new Fujinon camera lens. You’ll only see this at NOIR CITY!


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