FLY-BY-NIGHT
1942, Universal, 74 min, USA, Dir: Robert Siodmak

Don’t miss this little-seen gem, one of the first Hollywood efforts of noir maestro Robert Siodmak. Shifting with Hitchcockian aplomb between suggestive light comedy and thickly shadowed suspense, Siodmak stuffs two features’ worth of stylish set pieces into a sprightly running time, making this as good as wartime B picture as anything produced in the era. Richard Carlson’s and Nancy Kelly’s romance-on-the-run chemistry, laced with witty innuendo (and plenty of Kelly’s fine gams) is reminiscent of Robert Donat and Madeleine Carroll in THE 39 STEPS. Great fun, and surprisingly sexy for its time.


SOMEWHERE IN THE NIGHT
1946, 20th Century Fox, 111 min, USA, Dir: Joseph Mankiewicz

An amnesiac vet (John Hodiak) prowls through the Los Angeles underworld searching for the mysterious “Larry Cravat,” the lone clue to his true identity. Mankiewicz’s vastly underrated noir is a timeless trip through the noir netherworld, a place where no one can be trusted. With Richard Conte, Lloyd Nolan, Nancy Guild and a rogue's gallery of familiar faces lending vivid support.


THE NAKED CITY
1948, Janus Films, 96 min, USA, Dir: Jules Dassin

A landmark crime movie, producer Mark Hellinger's hardboiled tribute to his beloved Big Apple peels away all the stylistic melodramatics of noir to present Hollywood's first true policier. The scrupulously researched script by Malvin Wald and vivid location photography by William Daniels (an Oscar winner) combined to make this one of the most influential Hollywood films of the 1940s. With Barry Fitzgerald, Howard Duff, Don Taylor, Dorothy Hart and a very scary Ted de Corsia.


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