THE FLINTSTONES
1994, Universal, 91 min, USA, Dir: Brian Levant

Fred Flintstone (John Goodman) is in the hot seat after being framed for embezzlement by his conniving boss, but wife Wilma (Elizabeth Perkins) and neighbors Barney (Rick Moranis) and Betty Rubble (Rosie O'Donnell) come to the rescue in this live-action adaptation that became an international box-office hit. Director Brian Levant and executive producers Kathleen Kennedy and Steven Spielberg bring Hanna-Barbera’s prehistoric cartoon world of Bedrock vividly to life with a cast of comedic legends and outstanding sets, costume and production design. Kyle MacLachlan and Halle Berry co-star as scheming villains, and Elizabeth Taylor’s cameo would prove to be her final big-screen appearance. Colorful dinosaur effects by Jim Henson’s Creature Shop round out this family-friendly gem.


ARREBATO
RAPTURE
1979, 105 min, Spain, Dir: Iván Zulueta

This brooding cult masterpiece focuses on drug-addicted Madrid director José Sirgado (Eusebio Poncela), who is trying to finish his vampire movie when he gets a package from fellow filmmaker Pedro P. (Will More); the audiovisual materials it contains lead José on a one-way trip down a hallucinatory rabbit hole. Co-starring Almodóvar favorite Cecilia Roth, ARREBATO is loaded with symbolism, and one of the few films to truly capture the mesmerizing nature of cinema.


MEDEA
1969, Unzéro Films, 110 min, Italy/France/West Germany, Dir: Pier Paolo Pasolini

Two year after OEDIPUS REX, Pasolini returned to ancient Greek mythology, adapting all the famous trappings of Jason, his Argonauts and the golden fleece. In this version, Jason returns to Greece with the sorceress, Medea, unaware that she will not be accepted in his society. Once the king banishes her, her true powers are revealed as she plots her violent revenge. Legendary opera singer Maria Callas plays the titular role in her sole feature performance.


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