CREEPSHOW
1982, Warner Bros., 120 min, USA, Dir: George Romero

There hadn’t been a lot of anthology movies when the George Romero/Stephen King collaboration CREEPSHOW, a film inspired by classic EC horror comics, debuted in 1982; in comparison to the sober, big-budget thrills of POLTERGEIST and THE THING, the Romero/King effort was a refreshing blast of B-movie fun, low on budget and ambition but with a surprisingly good cast: Hal Holbrook, E.G. Marshall, Ted Danson, Leslie Nielsen, Ed Harris, Fritz Weaver and Stephen King himself. "The Lonesome Death of Jordy Verrill," the segment with King (as an incredibly stupid farmer), is probably the most memorable even though it’s a short vignette compared with the others - it’s a deft takeoff of THE BLOB and a riff on those moronic victims in ’50s sci-fi movies who always want to be first in line to check out that strange light coming from over the next rise.


KING KONG (1976)
1976, Paramount, 134 min, Dir: John Guillermin

Oil executive Charles Grodin and paleontologist Jeff Bridges set sail for a previously unexplored island, where they discover a gigantic ape; Jessica Lange (in her feature debut) is the beauty who charms the beast. Produced by Dino De Laurentiis, this hit remake takes a lighter tone than the original, and Rick Baker and Carlo Rambaldi’s work bringing Kong to life earned the film a visual effects Oscar. “The moviemaking team has come up with a pop classic that can stand in our affections right next to the original version.” - Pauline Kael, The New Yorker.


JACK FROST
1997, Vinegar Syndrome, 89 min, USA, Dir: Michael Cooney

On the way to his execution, serial killer Jack Frost's prison bus crashes into a tankard full of chemicals, which transform him into a giant killer snowman. Now as a super-powered psychotic Frosty, Jack goes on a new killing spree in one of the most outrageous holiday horror films of the VCR era.


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