THINNER
1996, Paramount, 93 min, USA, Dir: Tom Holland

In this creepy adaptation of the Stephen King novel, obese lawyer Billy Halleck (Robert John Burke) gets off scot-free after running over and killing a gypsy woman, whose father (Michael Constantine) then puts a curse on him. When Halleck begins to lose weight uncontrollably, he asks a mob boss client (Joe Mantegna, thoroughly menacing) to persuade the gypsy patriarch to lift the curse. For his work helping the central character shed the pounds, make-up artist Greg Cannom earned a well-deserved Saturn nomination.


WONDER WOMAN
2017, Warner Bros., 137 min, USA, Dir: Patty Jenkins

Gal Gadot stars as the title character in the epic action-adventure from director Patty Jenkins (MONSTER). Before she was Wonder Woman, she was Diana, princess of the Amazons, raised on a sheltered island paradise but trained to be an unconquerable warrior. When an American pilot crashes on her shores and tells of a massive conflict raging in the outside world, Diana leaves her home, convinced she can stop the threat. Fighting alongside man in a war to end all wars, Diana will discover her full powers … and her true destiny. The international cast includes Chris Pine, Robin Wright, Danny Huston and David Thewlis.


UGETSU
UGETSU MONOGATARI
1953, Janus Films, 94 min, Japan, Dir: Kenji Mizoguchi

An ambitious potter (Masayuki Mori) and his devoted spouse (Kinuyo Tanaka) as well as a kindred couple (Eitaro Ozawa, Mitsuko Mito) are torn apart by the civil-war chaos of 16th-century Japan. Both men realize their material dreams but at a tragic cost to their respective mates. In particular, Mori’s shallow success is reflected in his delirious romance with a ghostly noblewoman (Machiko Kyo), an affair that will drive him to the brink of madness. One of the most poignant evocations of the illusory nature of worldly desires and missed opportunities and one of the most haunting depictions of the supernatural ever committed to celluloid. Winner of the 1953 Venice Film Festival Silver Lion Award. “If poetry is manifest in each second, each shot filmed by Mizoguchi, it is because…it is the instinctive reflection of the filmmaker’s creative nobility. … The director of UGETSU MONOGATARI can describe an adventure which is at the same time a cosmogony.” – Jean-Luc Godard.


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