THE CINCINNATI KID
1965, Warner Bros., 102 min, USA, Dir: Norman Jewison

Steve McQueen is perfectly cast as an ambitious young gambler poised to triumph over master poker player Edward G. Robinson at a high-stakes game in Depression-era New Orleans. Adapted from the Richard Jessup novel by Ring Lardner, Jr. and Terry Southern, this suspenseful character study features a supporting cast of greats including Ann-Margret, Tuesday Weld, Rip Torn, Karl Malden, Joan Blondell and Cab Calloway.


LUDWIG
1973, AGFA, 238 min, Italy/France/West Germany, Dir: Luchino Visconti

Presented in its complete form in accordance with the director’s wishes, this look at the life and death of King Ludwig II of Bavaria is as opulent as any of Visconti’s sagas - a sweeping four-hour epic of 19th-century decadence. Dominated by Helmut Berger (THE DAMNED, DORIAN GRAY) in the title role, LUDWIG boasts an impressive cast: Romy Schneider (reprising her Elisabeth of Austria characterization from the SISSI trilogy), Silvana Mangano (BITTER RICE), Gert Fröbe (GOLDFINGER), John Moulder-Brown (DEEP END) and Trevor Howard (BRIEF ENCOUNTER).


THE IMAGE BOOK
LE LIVRE D'IMAGE
2018, Kino Lorber, 84 min, Switzerland/France, Dir: Jean-Luc Godard

The legendary Jean-Luc Godard adds to his influential, iconoclastic legacy with this provocative collage film essay, a vast ontological inquiry into the history of the moving image and a commentary on the contemporary world. Displaying an encyclopedic grasp of cinema and its history, Godard pieces together fragments from some of the greatest films of the past, then digitally alters, bleaches and washes them, all in the service of reflecting on what he sees in front of him and what he makes of the dissonance that surrounds him. He uses his own voice, reminiscent of Leonard Cohen or Bob Dylan in the twilight of their careers, to guide us through the fascinating labyrinth of his mind. As always with Godard, the key issues he raises have to do with the legacy of the last century and its horrors: the incomprehension of Hiroshima and Auschwitz, events that coincided with cinema but have somehow eluded its gaze. And, movingly, he also reflects on orientalism and the Arab world, grounding the new film very much in the present. Winner of the first Special Palme d'Or to be awarded in the history of the Cannes Film Festival, THE IMAGE BOOK is another extraordinary addition to the French master's vast filmography. - Piers Handling, Toronto International Film Festival.


Syndicate content