THE LONG KISS GOODNIGHT
1996, Warner Bros., 121 min, USA, Dir: Renny Harlin

Schoolteacher Samantha Caine (Geena Davis) has built a good life for herself and her daughter eight years after washing ashore with total amnesia. When a slight concussion and a private investigator (Samuel L. Jackson) restore some of her memory, Samantha realizes she had once been a highly trained assassin - and that she hasn’t quite escaped her past. Sharp dialogue from screenwriter Shane Black helps make this one of the most entertaining action thrillers of the 1990s.


THE LOST CITY OF Z
2016, Amazon Studios, 141 min, Dir: James Gray

Based on author David Grann’s nonfiction bestseller, this is the incredible true story of British explorer Percy Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam), who journeys into the Amazon at the dawn of the 20th century and discovers evidence of a previously unknown civilization that may have once inhabited the region. Despite ridicule from the scientific establishment, the determined Fawcett - supported by his devoted wife (Sienna Miller), son (Tom Holland) and aide-de-camp (Robert Pattinson) - returns time and again to his beloved jungle in an attempt to prove his case, culminating in his mysterious disappearance in 1925. A stirring tribute to the exploratory spirit and a conflicted adventurer driven to the verge of obsession.


THE WOUND
2017, Kino Lorber, 88 min, Dir: John Trengove

Brimming with sex and violence, THE WOUND is an exploration of tradition and sexuality set amid South Africa’s Xhosa culture. Every year, the tribe’s young men are brought to the mountains of the Eastern Cape to participate in an ancient coming-of-age ritual. Xolani, a quiet and sensitive factory worker (played by openly gay musician Nakhane Touré), is assigned to guide Kwanda, a city boy from Johannesburg sent by his father to be toughened up, through this rite of passage into manhood. As Kwanda defiantly negotiates his queer identity within this masculine environment, he quickly recognizes the nature of Xolani’s relationship with fellow guide Vija. The three men commence a dangerous dance with one another and their own desires, and the threat of exposure soon elevates the tension to breaking point. “John Trengove's hard-edged but beautifully wrought study of clashing Xhosa models of masculinity will be an eye-opener to outsiders - and some South Africans, too.” - Guy Lodge, Variety.


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