GUEST OF HONOUR
2020, Kino Lorber, 105 min, Canada, Dir: Atom Egoyan

Jim (David Thewlis) and his daughter Veronica (Laysla De Oliveira), a high school music teacher, attempt to unravel their complicated histories and intertwined secrets in the latest film from Academy Award nominee Atom Egoyan (THE SWEET HEREAFTER), which weaves through time exploring perception and penance, memory and forgiveness. A hoax instigated by an aggressive school bus driver (Rossif Sutherland) goes very wrong. Accused of abusing her position of authority with 17-year-old Clive (Alexandre Bourgeois) and another student, Veronica is imprisoned. Convinced that she deserves to be punished for crimes she committed at an earlier age, Veronica rebuffs her father’s attempts to secure her early release. Confused and frustrated by her intransigence, Jim's anguish begins to impinge on his job. As a food inspector, he wields great power over small, family-owned restaurants. It’s a power he doesn’t hesitate to use. While preparing Jim's funeral, Veronica confides the secrets of her past to Father Greg (Luke Wilson), who may hold the final piece of this father-daughter puzzle.


THE TRUTH (2019)
LA VERITÉ
2020, IFC Films, 106 min, France/Japan/Switzerland, Dir: Hirokazu Kore-eda

Fabienne (Catherine Deneuve) is an aging French movie star who, despite her momentary lapses in memory, remains a venerable force to be reckoned with. Upon the publication of her memoirs, her daughter Lumir (Juliette Binoche) returns to Paris from New York with her husband (Ethan Hawke) and their young daughter to commemorate its release. A sharp and funny battle of wits ensues between the mother-daughter duo, as Lumir takes issue with Fabienne's rose-colored version of the past. Reflected cleverly by Fabienne's latest role in a sci-fi drama, their strained relationship takes a poignant journey toward possible reconciliation. Charming, bold, and imbued with endless emotional insight, THE TRUTH offers a relatable look at human relationships, featuring exquisite performances from its all-star cast.


SHELF LIFE
1993, 81 min, USA, Dir: Paul Bartel

The last feature directorial effort from Paul Bartel (DEATH RACE 2000, EATING RAOUL) offers a subversive look at suburban values across two generations. Spooked by the Kennedy assassination, the St. Cloud family retreats to the safety of their fallout shelter - but never gets the "all clear" when the nuclear holocaust they'd feared fails to materialize. Decades later, after their parents have died, Tina (O-Lan Jones), Pam (Andrea Stein) and Scotty (Jim Turner) are still in that bunker, having grown to adulthood through daily rituals fashioned from snippets of television and vague memories of the world outside. Never before released, SHELF LIFE strikes a darkly comedic tone sure to make it a cult favorite.


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