LA DOLCE VITA
1960, Paramount, 185 min, Italy, Dir: Federico Fellini

Director Federico Fellini feels his way from the neo-realist past to the illusory future in this incredible emotional travelogue of the soul of modern Rome. How better to open the free-wheeling 1960s than with this alternately funny, feral, sweet and seductive meditation on what is truly meaningful (if anything) for the dusk-to-dawn Italian jet set? Marcello Mastroianni was catapulted into superstar status as the sensitive tabloid reporter juggling the affections of several women (voluptuous movie star Anita Ekberg, icy mistress Anouk Aimee and neurotic girlfriend Magali Noel) while making the rounds of the spirit-destroying nightlife of the Via Veneto. Mastroianni’s scene with Ekberg in the Trevi Fountain at dawn remains one of the most timeless, memorable images ever to emerge from world cinema. "I feel that decadence is indispensable to rebirth." - Fellini. In Italian with English subtitles.


BLUE THUNDER
1983, Sony Repertory, 109 min, USA, Dir: John Badham

Déjà vu 1983! The government has unleashed its newest weapon: a heavily armed helicopter that can spy on civilians from 1,000 feet and incinerate entire city blocks. The only ones who can stop Big Brother (in the form of Malcolm McDowell’s fascist cop) from using it against us are Vietnam vet-turned-police chopper pilot Roy Scheider and his tech-savvy partner, Daniel Stern. Director John Badham's paranoid actioner flies high with stunning cinematography by John Alonzo and dazzling dogfights over downtown L.A.


THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS
1942, Warner Bros., 88 min, USA, Dir: Orson Welles

Director Orson Welles' poetic, tragic adaptation of Booth Tarkington's novel, centering on the fall of one wealthy family, with Stanley Cortez's dynamic camerawork providing a panorama of turn-of-the-century America and the decay of the old aristocracy.


Syndicate content