PINK FLOYD – THE WALL
1982, Warner Bros., 99 min, USA, Dir: Alan Parker

Director Alan Parker's vivid film interpretation of the British rock combo's classic concept album THE WALL fuses curious fantasy with dark, tragic drama on an epic scale. Antihero Pink is beaten down by life from his earliest childhood days in WWII Britain, and despite his rise to rock-star fame, he continues to build a “wall” around himself. The film makes innovative use of sets, costumes and special effects, imbuing the movie with a bizarre surrealism worthy of Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dali. Both disturbing and bedazzling, PINK FLOYD: THE WALL is a must-see film for any music lover. With Bob Geldof, Bob Hoskins.


AGORA
2009, Newmarket Films, 127 min, Spain, Dir: Alejandro Amenábar

Set in Roman Egypt, 400 A.D., this compelling historical drama follows Hypatia (Rachel Weisz), a Greek woman and mathematician, astronomer and philosopher bravely struggling to save the wisdom of classical antiquity in the midst of religious war. Filming took place on the island of Malta, where production designer Guy Hendrix Dyas re-created large parts of the city on location, further extended with the help of computer-generated imagery. The construction of the main set employed almost 400 people, and was the largest ever built on the island.


HENRY: PORTRAIT OF A SERIAL KILLER
1986, Greycat Films, 83 min, USA, Dir: John McNaughton

This disturbing, low-budget indie, loosely based on the story of real-life serial killer Henry Lee Lucas, delivers exactly what its title promises. Brilliantly played by Michael Rooker, Henry is an ex-con living in a Chicago apartment with Otis, a gas station attendant he met in prison. In Henry’s day job he’s a part-time exterminator, but killing is also his hobby - one Otis soon comes to share in a series of gruesome slayings. When Otis’ sister Becky comes to live with them, she and Henry share a mutual attraction, but can any human being survive contact with this cold-blooded killer? The film landed on numerous year-end best lists upon its release, with writer-director McNaughton’s matter-of-fact style and sure hand with performers (many of them nonprofessional) drawing deserved comparisons to Cassavetes. “One of the 20 scariest movies of all time.” - Entertainment Weekly.


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