MAIGRET SETS A TRAP
MAIGRET TEND UN PIEGE
1958, Kino Lorber, 119 min, France/Italy, Dir: Jean Delannoy

Though he was often subject to disparagement by New Wave critics, veteran director Jean Delannoy actually pushed forward the Parisian crime film with this first of two Inspector Maigret adaptations featuring the incomparable Jean Gabin. MAIGRET TEND UN PIEGE adds its own cynical tone to the police procedural, aided by Delannoy’s expert use of actual locations in Montmartre. Gabin fits the role of Maigret like a glove, and he’s surrounded by a cast of colorful characters, including well-shaped turns from Annie Girardot and Jean Desailly.


THE STRANGE MR. STEVE
L’ETRANGE MONSIEUR STEVE
1957, Gaumont, 90 min, France, Dir: Raymond Bailly

Ever wonder what Jeanne Moreau was up to before she took over the Paris night in ELEVATOR TO THE GALLOWS? It turns out she was in more than a dozen French noirs, including L’ETRANGE MONSIEUR STEVE - where the action is both criminal and amorous. As the moll of a clever gangster (played by singer Armand Mestral), Moreau seduces a milquetoast bank teller (Philippe Lemaire) only to inexplicably fall in love with him - which, as they say in France, makes things très compliqué! Also on hand to create added menace is Lino Ventura as Mestral’s hulking right-hand man. MONSIEUR STEVE benefits from a witty script by Frédèric Dard, master of the San Antonio series and often called “the Raymond Chandler of France.”


POISON IVY
LA MOME VERT-DE-GRIS
1952, Pathe, 97 min, France, Dir: Bernard Borderie

The first of Eddie Constantine’s (France’s biggest star of the 1950s) jokey, self-referential Lemmy Caution tales, LA MOME VERT-DE-GRIS also features blonde bombshell Dominique Wilms, who leaves every man she meets during the film’s delirious action more than a little breathless. As Bertrand Tavernier noted, Constantine’s alter ego Lemmy Caution is the template for James Bond - though he’s clearly more hangdog and unkempt than the suave British spy. But Constantine wins us over with his crooked smile, his love of liquor and women, and his reckless courage in the face of gunfire. LA MOME VERT-DE-GRIS makes it clear why Paris was at Eddie’s feet in the ’50s, and you’ll want to scratch that itch for more Lemmy!


Syndicate content