PEGGY SUE GOT MARRIED
1986, Sony Repertory, 103 min, USA, Dir: Francis Ford Coppola

Kathleen Turner earned an Oscar nomination in the title role as a recently separated housewife who attends her high school reunion only to be transported a quarter-century back in time to her senior year. As she revisits the events that shaped the course of her life and considers changing them, Peggy Sue’s future husband (Nicolas Cage) tries to convince her of his love. This touching romantic comedy features a strong supporting cast including up-and-comers Jim Carrey, Joan Allen and Helen Hunt as well as veteran performers Maureen O'Sullivan and John Carradine.


THE NATURAL
1984, Sony Repertory, 134 min, USA, Dir: Barry Levinson

Based on the 1952 novel by Bernard Malamud. Barry Levinson (RAIN MAN, BUGSY) directs Robert Redford as Roy Hobbs, an over-the-hill rookie who appears out of nowhere to lead a losing 1930s baseball team, the New York Knights, to the top. A tragic turn had destroyed Hobbs' early playing career, and now he is going to live what should have been. The all-star cast features Glenn Close (nominated for a Best Actress Academy Award), Kim Basinger, Robert Duvall and Barbara Hershey. The great music score, one of the most recognized in film history, is by Randy Newman. Life often imitates art, as the Oscar-nominated score is now recognized as the soundtrack behind the legendary Kirk Gibson home run for the L.A. Dodgers in the 1988 World Series. Redford’s bat, "Wonderboy," rivals CITIZEN KANE’s sleigh, "Rosebud," as one of Hollywood’s best-known props. Beautifully shot by cinematographer Caleb Deschanel.


EIGHT HOURS DON'T MAKE A DAY
ACHT STUNDEN SIND KEIN TAG
1972, Janus Films, 478 min, West Germany, Dir: Rainer Werner Fassbinder

Commissioned to make a working-class family drama, up-and-coming director Rainer Werner Fassbinder took the assignment and ran, upending expectations by depicting social realities in West Germany from a critical - yet far from cynical - perspective. Over the course of several hours, the sprawling story tracks the everyday triumphs and travails of the young toolmaker Jochen (Gottfried John) and many of the people populating his world, including the woman he loves (Hanna Schygulla), his eccentric nuclear family, and his fellow workers, with whom he bands together to improve conditions on the factory floor. Rarely screened since its popular but controversial initial broadcast, EIGHT HOURS DON'T MAKE A DAY rates as a true discovery, one of Fassbinder’s earliest and most tender experiments with the possibilities of melodrama.


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