PHANTOM OF THE PARADISE
1974, 20th Century Fox, 92 min, USA, Dir: Brian De Palma

Director Brian De Palma’s vivid reimagining of The Phantom of the Opera is at once camp, surreal, dazzling and heartbreaking. Cutthroat record producer Swann (Paul Williams, who also wrote the fine score) steals both the music and the girl from composer Winslow Leech (William Finely). Horribly disfigured in an attempt to reclaim his artistic credit, Leech becomes the Phantom at Swan’s new rock palace, the Paradise. Jessica Harper, contributing her creamy alto, plays Leech’s love interest, and Gerrit Graham is hysterical as glitter-rock star "Beef." De Palma turns what could have been a lightweight indulgence into clever pop-culture commentary.


THE KILLING OF A SACRED DEER
2017, A24, 109 min, UK/Ireland, Dir: Yorgos Lanthimos

Almost guaranteed to spark debate, director Yorgos Lanthimos’ (THE LOBSTER) journey into the heart of darkness is both a thriller and a parable on the evil of inaction. Colin Farrell is Steven, a brilliant neurosurgeon whose clinical attitude extends to his personal life; his interactions with his family feel as regimented as post-surgery conversations with colleagues. But Steven also has a strange friendship with Martin (Barry Keoghan), an awkward 16-year-old. Things take a bizarre turn when Martin tries to bring Steven into his family and makes the doctor a frightening proposition - a choice that will determine who lives and who dies. The uniformly great cast includes Nicole Kidman and Alicia Silverstone.


ONE DAY YOU’LL UNDERSTAND
PLUS TARD
2008, Kino Lorber, 90 min, France/Germany/Israel, Dir: Amos Gitaï

In 1987, as the trial of Nazi war criminal Klaus Barbie unfolds on television, French businessman Victor Bastien (Hippolyte Girardot) finds a distressing “Aryan declaration” authored by his late father among family documents. His mother, Rivka (the legendary Jeanne Moreau), keeps a stubborn silence. As Victor becomes more obsessed with past secrets, he takes his family to the tiny village where Rivka’s parents were forced to hide during the war. A poignant and ultimately optimistic portrait of a family’s confrontation with the wounds of the past and their hopes for a better future.


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