HIGHWAY PATROLMAN
1991, Kino Lorber, 104 min, Dir: Alex Cox

“I used to think HIGHWAY PATROLMAN was about the impossibility of doing good,” notes Alex Cox (REPO MAN) of one of his favorite films. “But now I think it’s really about the impossibility of imposing goodness on others.” Inspired by the experiences of former Mexican lawman Poncho Granados – who served as a driver for Cox while the director was scouting locations for WALKER – the crime drama follows a rookie member (Roberto Sosa) of Mexico’s national highway patrol, who struggles to keep on the straight and narrow in a department rife with corruption.


BIG FISH
2003, Sony Pictures, 120 min, Dir: Tim Burton

In the heartwarming BIG FISH, director Tim Burton brings his inimitable imagination on a journey that delves deep into a fabled relationship between a father and his son. Edward Bloom (Albert Finney) has always been a teller of tall-tales about his oversized life as a young man (Ewan McGregor), when his wanderlust led him on an unlikely journey from a small-town in Alabama, around the world, and back again. His mythic exploits dart from the delightful to the delirious as he weaves epic tales about giants, blizzards, a witch and conjoined-twin lounge singers. With his larger-than-life stories, Bloom charms almost everyone he encounters except for his estranged son Will (Billy Crudup). When his mother Sandra (Jessica Lange) tries to reunite them, Will must learn how to separate fact from fiction as he comes to terms with his father's great feats and great failings.


UNDER THE VOLCANO
1984, Janus Films, 112 min, Dir: John Huston

This searing drama follows the final day in the life of self-destructive British consul Geoffrey Firmin (Albert Finney, in an Oscar-nominated tour de force) on the eve of World War II. Withering from alcoholism, Firmin stumbles through a small Mexican village amidst the Day of the Dead fiesta, attempting to reconnect with his estranged wife (Jacqueline Bisset) but only further alienating himself. John Huston's ambitious tackling of Malcolm Lowry's towering “unadaptable” novel gave the incomparable Finney one of his grandest roles and was the legendary THE TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE director's triumphant return to filmmaking in Mexico.


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