DON'T LOOK NOW
1973, Paramount, 110 min, Dir: Nicolas Roeg

Director Nicolas Roeg’s atmospheric adaptation of Daphne DuMaurier’s story is a haunting meditation on the consequences of repressing traits inside us that could mean the difference between life and death. Antiquities restorer Donald Sutherland and wife Julie Christie, in mourning after the accidental drowning of their young daughter, journey to Venice during the off-season to help renovate a church. But their encounter with two strange sisters, one of whom is a blind clairvoyant, pulls them into shadowy back alleys and deserted canals and onto the radar of a warped serial killer terrorizing the city. A brilliant variation on Italy’s homegrown giallothriller genre then enjoying success in early 1970s European cinema.


MOONLIGHT
2016, A24, 111 min, Dir: Barry Jenkins

Director Barry Jenkins’ Golden Globe-winning coming-of-age story is told in three chapters, with a trio of actors (Alex R. Hibbert, Ashton Sanders and Trevante Rhodes) playing central character Chiron, a boy from Miami’s crime-ridden Liberty City neighborhood who survives a gauntlet of bullying with the support of some unexpected allies. Costarring Mahershala Ali, Janelle Monáe and Naomie Harris. “Its story may be sprinkled with drug dealers and addicts. But its message is clear: The world is richer and deeper and more complex than we ever imagined, and even its most troubled characters — just like us — are looking for love.” - Stephen Galloway, The Hollywood Reporter.


THE ELEPHANT MAN
1980, Paramount, 124 min, Dir: David Lynch

Based on two books about the real-life Elephant Man, John Merrick, director David Lynch recounts this severely deformed man’s perilous life in Victorian England in breathtaking black-and-white. Sir Frederick Treves (Anthony Hopkins) rescues Merrick from a circus freak show where he is assumed to be retarded, takes him to a hospital for tests and discovers that Merrick, in fact, has great intellect and capacity for emotion. John Hurt’s ability to project Merrick’s humanity earned him a Best Actor Oscar nomination, along with the film’s seven other nominations including Best Picture and Best Director. Lynch’s use of costumes, makeup, Freddie Francis’ cinematography and John Morris’ score remain commendably understated, allowing the sadness of the film to avoid sentimentalism. With Anne Bancroft, John Gielgud, Wendy Hiller. "ELEPHANT MAN has the power and some of the dream logic of a silent film, yet there are also wrenching, pulsating sounds -the hissing steam and the pounding of the start of the industrial age. It's Dickensian London, with perhaps a glimpse of the process that gave rise to Cubism." - Pauline Kael.


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