EIGHT HOURS OF TERROR
HACHIJIKAN NO KYŌFU
1957, AGFA, 78 min, Japan, Dir: Seijun Suzuki

After a typhoon stops a train on its track, the passengers are forced to take a bus through the countryside. To make matters worse, some escaped criminals try to hijack the bus. EIGHT HOURS OF TERROR is Suzuki's riff on one of his favorite films, John Ford's STAGECOACH, as well as one of his best early thrillers. Text courtesy of Doc Films.


SATAN’S TOWN
AKUMA NO MACHI
1956, Nikkatsu, 79 min, Japan, Dir: Seijun Suzuki

Director Seijun Suzuki's third film (and his first to feature gangsters as protagonists) focuses on a boss and his henchman after they escape from prison. Suzuki shows his promise through cleverly constructed editing and bold compositions, particularly in the film's murder scenes (of which there are many). Text courtesy of Doc Films.


12 O’CLOCK BOYS
2013, Oscilloscope Laboratories, 76 min, USA, Dir: Lotfy Nathan

The 12 O’Clock Boys are a notorious urban dirt-bike pack in Baltimore - popping wheelies and weaving at excessive speeds through traffic, the group always manages to evade the hamstrung police. In Lotfy Nathan’s wild, dynamic documentary (three years in the making), their stunning antics are envisioned through the eyes of young adolescent Pug – a bright kid from the Westside obsessed with the riders and willing to do anything to join their ranks. Premiering to critical acclaim at the SXSW and Hot Docs film festivals (where Nathan won the HBO Emerging Artist Award), 12 O’CLOCK BOYS provides a compelling and intimate personal story of a young boy and his dangerous, thrilling dream.


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