HIGHWAY PATROLMAN
1991, Kino Lorber, 104 min, Dir: Alex Cox

“I used to think HIGHWAY PATROLMAN was about the impossibility of doing good,” notes Alex Cox (REPO MAN) of one of his favorite films. “But now I think it’s really about the impossibility of imposing goodness on others.” Inspired by the experiences of former Mexican lawman Poncho Granados – who served as a driver for Cox while the director was scouting locations for WALKER – the crime drama follows a rookie member (Roberto Sosa) of Mexico’s national highway patrol, who struggles to keep on the straight and narrow in a department rife with corruption.


10 TO MIDNIGHT
1983, Park Circus/MGM, 101 min, USA, Dir: J. Lee Thompson

“Forget what's legal and do what's right.” A Golan and Globus production that doesn't skimp on nudity or violence, this riveting police thriller showcases Charles Bronson at his vigilante best. He stars as Leo Kessler, a tough L.A. cop whose daughter is stalked by a cunning sex-killer (Gene Davis); the first-rate cast includes Wilford Brimley and Geoffrey Lewis.


…AND JUSTICE FOR ALL.
1979, Sony Repertory, 119 min, USA, Dir: Norman Jewison

“You're out of order! You're out of order! The whole trial is out of order!” Al Pacino stars as Arthur Kirkland, who has seen some of the worst abuses of the courtroom in his 12 years as a defense attorney. Nonetheless he continues to fight passionately for his clients - but is thrown for a loop when one of them is a judge (John Forsythe) who has clashed with Kirkland in the past. Pacino’s tour de force performance earned an Oscar nomination, as did Barry Levinson and Valerie Curtin’s original screenplay. A still-relevant skewering of the American legal system, …AND JUSTICE FOR ALL boasts a fine supporting cast including Jack Warden, Christine Lahti, Jeffrey Tambor and Lee Strasberg.


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