CROSSFIRE
1947, Warner Bros., 86 min, USA, Dir: Edward Dmytryk

Robert Mitchum, Robert Young and Robert Ryan lead the cast in this noir-tinged drama, among the first Hollywood films to confront anti-Semitism. When a Jewish man is murdered, a homicide detective (Young) focuses on a group of former soldiers, while an Army sergeant (Mitchum) conducts a parallel investigation to clear his friend of the crime. Costarring Gloria Grahame, CROSSFIRE earned Oscar nominations for Best Picture and Best Director.


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1969, Janus Films, 116 min, West Germany/France/Luxembourg, Dir: Barbet Schroeder

Director Barbet Schroeder’s stunning portrait of the dark underbelly of the ’60s sex-and-drugs revolution is like a Velvet Underground song on film: Mimsey Farmer stars as the gorgeous, Edie Sedgwick-like junkie princess who draws German drifter Klaus Grunberg into her sunlit world of Euro beach parties, retired Nazis and heroin fixes. With a brilliant, sinister score by Pink Floyd that perfectly captures the dreamy paranoia of Schroeder’s early masterpiece.


CRISS CROSS
1949, Universal, 87 min, USA, Dir: Robert Siodmak

When he died in 1947, producer Mark Hellinger had just begun pre-production on this crime-infected love story. Thanks to the inspired vision of director Siodmak, CRISS CROSS now stands as perhaps the most darkly poetic rendering of amour fou in all film noir. Burt Lancaster and Dan Duryea plot a daring heist, while vying for the affections of sensual Yvonne DeCarlo. Remade by Stephen Soderbergh as THE UNDERNEATH.


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