THE GLASS WEB
1953, Universal, 81 min, USA, Dir: Jack Arnold

Before emerging as one of the 1950s’ top sci-fi directors, Jack Arnold (CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON) turned his attention to film noir for this tense drama set in the then-new world of television. John Forsythe and Edward G. Robinson star as head writer and researcher, respectively, on a true-crime TV program. Both men are involved with femme fatale Kathleen Hughes; when she is murdered, the case is chosen for the season finale – but will the script reveal her real killer?


CONFIDENTIALLY YOURS
VIVEMENT DIMANCHE!
1983, Janus Films, 110 min, Dir: François Truffaut

In François Truffaut’s delightfully entertaining tribute to Hitchcock, a businessman (Jean-Louis Trintingnant) is wrongly accused of murder, and while he goes on the lam his secretary (Fanny Ardant) tries to find the real killer. Gorgeous black-and-white photography by Nestor Almendros and a witty screenplay (by Truffaut and frequent collaborators Suzanne Schiffman and Jean Aurel, adapting hardboiled American writer Charles Williams’ The Long Saturday Night) make this one of the director’s most enjoyable efforts.


SPRING BREAKERS
2012, A24, 94 min, Dir: Harmony Korine

Harmony Korine presents a bold new vision of the seasonal American ritual known as "spring break" - the bacchanalia of bikinis, beach parties and beer bongs that draws hordes of college students to the Florida coast and elsewhere each year. Brit (Ashley Benson), Faith (Selena Gomez), Candy (Vanessa Hudgens) and Cotty (Rachel Korine) are best friends anxious to cut loose on their own spring break adventure, but they lack sufficient funds. After holding up a restaurant for quick cash, the girls head to the shore in a stolen car for what they discover is the party of a lifetime. They’re thrown in jail - but quickly bailed out by Alien (James Franco), a local rapper, drug pusher and arms dealer who lures them into a criminal underbelly that’s as lurid as it is liberating for a close-knit gang of girlfriends who are still figuring out their path.


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