SEA OF LOVE
1989, Universal, 113 min, USA, Dir: Harold Becker

Burned-out New York City detective Frank Keller (Al Pacino) gets the call when a man is found murdered with a 45 of the song “Sea of Love” at his bedside. Among Keller’s few leads is a personals ad that had been placed by the victim; teaming up with another investigator (John Goodman) working a similar case, they place an ad of their own. Among the women it attracts is Helen Cruger (Ellen Barkin), and though she can’t be eliminated as a suspect, Keller begins a relationship with her. There’s terrific chemistry among the leads (Pacino earned a Golden Globe nomination for his performance), and this hit erotic thriller will keep you guessing until the very end.


THE SISTERS BROTHERS
2018, Annapurna Pictures, 121 min, France/Spain/Romania/USA, Dir: Jacques Audiard

Based on the novel by Patrick deWitt, this reimagining of the cinematic Western is a dangerous, witty and emotionally cathartic exploration of what it means to be a man. It is 1851, and Charlie and Eli Sisters (Joaquin Phoenix and John C. Reilly) are both brothers and assassins, boys grown to men in a savage and hostile world. Each increasingly questions, and quibbles with, the other’s methods as they travel through the mountains of Oregon and eventually to the Gold Rush land of California. It’s a journey that will test the deadly family ties that bind - and may allow them to rediscover what remains of their humanity. Costarring Jake Gyllenhaal and Riz Ahmed. “This first English-language outing by the ever-adventurous French director Jacques Audiard (A PROPHET, RUST AND BONE) is a connoisseur’s delight, as it's boisterously acted and detailed down to its last bit of shirt stitching.” - Todd McCarthy, The Hollywood Reporter.


CHICAGO
2002, Park Circus/Miramax, 113 min, USA/Germany/Canada, Dir: Rob Marshall

At a time when crimes of passion result in celebrity headlines, nightclub sensation Velma Kelly (Catherine Zeta-Jones) and spotlight-seeking Roxie Hart (Renée Zellweger) both find themselves sharing space on Chicago's famed Murderess Row. They also share Billy Flynn (Richard Gere), the town's slickest lawyer with a talent for turning notorious defendants into local legends. But in Chicago, there's only room for one legend! Based on the Bob Fosse stage musical, the film won six Academy Awards, including Best Picture, with supporting performances by John C. Reilly (as Hart’s gullible husband) and Queen Latifah (as a corrupt jail matron) garnering additional Oscar nominations.


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