BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK
1955, Warner Bros., 81 min, USA, Dir: John Sturges

Set in a mythical desert town post-WWII, the film follows one-armed combat veteran Spencer Tracy as he seeks to discover the whereabouts of a Japanese-American comrade. De facto town leader and full-time racist bully Robert Ryan and his thuggish pals, Lee Marvin and Ernest Borgnine, are the stateside fascists in this suspense-filled classic from director John Sturges and screenwriter Millard Kaufman. Co-starring Anne Francis, Walter Brennan, Dean Jagger and John Ericson.


A KISS BEFORE DYING
1956, Park Circus/MGM, 104 min, USA, Dir: Gerd Oswald

Social-climbing college student Bud Corliss (Robert Wagner) is determined to marry into money – but his girlfriend’s pregnancy could derail his plans. That’s when Bud truly becomes a ladykiller. This rare Cinemascope color noir, based on the Edgar-winning novel by Ira Levin, reveals the psychosis lurking beneath the American affluence of the Eisenhower era. Filmed on location in Tucson, Arizona, and co-starring Jeffrey Hunter, Virginia Leith, Joanne Woodward and Mary Astor.


THE MIDNIGHT STORY
1957, Universal, 89 min, USA, Dir: Joe Pevney

A San Francisco motorcycle cop (Tony Curtis) becomes obsessed with solving the murder of his mentor, a popular North Beach priest. Not allowed to follow his suspicions, he chucks his badge and becomes an undercover vigilante. The prime suspect, a popular Italian patriarch (Gilbert Roland), ends up loving him like his own son. But is he guilty of murder? The San Francisco locations are accentuated by atmospheric black-and-white Cinemascope.


Syndicate content