BABY DRIVER
2017, TriStar Pictures, 112 min, UK/USA, Dir: Edgar Wright

The breakout hit of the year, Edgar Wright’s BABY DRIVER is the heist film we’ve long dreamed of. Effortlessly paying homage to its revered predecessors while magnificently catapulting the genre forward,

BABY DRIVER is a true stick of cinematic dynamite, unlike anything we’ve seen before. BABY DRIVER tells the story of the best getaway driver in the business, the always cool, music encyclopedia, Baby. After being coerced into working for a notorious crime boss, Baby is partnered with a rogue’s gallery of professional criminals as they embark on a doomed heist. In order to survive, Baby must draw on every driving skill at his disposal - and his ever-present iPod.

With a cast to die for, BABY DRIVER is a technical marvel that is crisply shot and masterfully edited; it also contains one of the greatest soundtracks committed to film. The result is a pulsating revelation and a reminder how brilliant cinema can be when it’s so effortlessly executed – BABY DRIVER is an exhilarating joyride from start to finish.


ICHI THE KILLER
KOROSHI YA ICHI
2001, Well Go Pictures, 126 min, Japan, Dir: Takashi Miike

Adapted from an ultra-popular manga comic banned in several Japanese prefectures, ICHI is one of the funniest, most horrific, blood-drenched yakuza thrillers ever made (and director Miike’s most successful film in Japan to date). Nao Omori is Ichi, an immature crybaby who dons a black rubber superhero suit and hatchet blade boots to do the bidding of Shinya Tsukamoto (director of TETSUO: IRON MAN), an unassuming mastermind bent on rending the fabric of Shinjuku’s yakuza and destroying bleach-blond S&M freak/mobster Kakihara (Tadanobu Asano). Be forewarned, Ichi is an equal-opportunity assassin, and both men and women sacrifice body parts when they cross his path!


BRAWL IN CELL BLOCK 99
2017, RLJE Films, 132 min, USA, Dir: S. Craig Zahler

BONE TOMAHAWK director S. Craig Zahler’s sophomore feature follows Bradley Thomas (Vince Vaughn), a former boxer turned drug runner who is incarcerated after a deal goes horribly wrong. Sentenced to serve time under the watch of the sadistic Warden Tuggs (Don Johnson), Thomas must fight to stay alive and to protect those he loves. In lesser hands this narrative could have beaten a pedestrian path, but here Zahler flirts with viewers, deliberately taking his time to establish Vaughn’s character until he arrives at prison and metamorphoses into a killing machine that is part Frankenstein monster, part shark from JAWS and part monster truck.


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