PANDORA’S BOX
DIE BÜCHSE DER PANDORA
1929, Janus Films, 110 min, Germany, Dir: G.W. Pabst

As Henri Langlois once thundered, “There is no Garbo! There is no Dietrich! There is only Louise Brooks!” Here she proves it with one of the wildest performances of the silent era, as the dancer-turned-hooker Lulu who attracts men like moths to a candle. Politicians, titans of industry and the aristocracy are all part of the milieu Lulu inhabits as the story begins; her eventual descent to a criminal underworld underlines the fragility of German society between the wars. The combination of Brooks and director G.W. Pabst (“It was sexual hatred that engrossed his whole being with its flaming reality,” she once said) is still astonishing.


STRANGE SHADOWS IN AN EMPTY ROOM
UNA MAGNUM SPECIAL PER TONY SAITTA
1976, Park Circus/MGM, 99 min, Italy/Canada, Dir: Alberto De Martino

Stuart Whitman stars as an Ottawa police captain looking for the person who poisoned his sister. But when the constraints of the law restrain his investigation, he goes rogue using brutality to get answers. Featuring appearances by Martin Landau, John Saxon and Tisa Farrow, this shot-in-Canada giallo-poliziotteschi hybrid showcases one of the all-time great movie car chases.


BAD EDUCATION
LA MALA EDUCACIÓN
2004, Sony Pictures Classics, 106 min, Dir: Pedro Almodóvar

Pedro Almodóvar’s follow-up to his Academy Award-winning TALK TO HER, BAD EDUCATION is an outrageous tale of desire, revenge and murder. Filmmaker Enrique (Fele Martínez) gets a visit from an aspiring actor claiming to be his old school friend Ignacio (Gael Garcia Bernal, Y TU MAMÁ TAMBIÉN), who has written a story about their traumatic childhood spent at Catholic school. In the story, a drag performer known as Zahara (also played by Bernal) attempts to blackmail a predatory priest by exposing their scandalous past. The tale provides the inspiration for Enrique's next film. But when the villainous priest from their school days arrives to tell his own version of the events, the truth is wilder than anything anyone could have imagined. Peter Travers of Rolling Stone raves, "Gael Garcia Bernal is dynamite!" and calls the film "a rapturous masterwork!"


Syndicate content