THE DEVIL’S EYE
DJÄVULENS ÖGA
1960, Janus Films, 84 min, Sweden, Dir: Ingmar Bergman

This sophisticated fantasy - the last Bergman film to be shot by the great Gunnar Fischer - is an engaging satire on petit-bourgeois morals. The Devil suffers from an inflamed eye, which he informs Don Juan (Jarl Kulle) can only be cured if a young woman’s chastity is breached. So the legendary lover ascends from Hell and sets about seducing the innocent pastor’s daughter, Britt-Marie (Bibi Andersson). Bergman’s dialogue bubbles with an irony reminiscent of his beloved Molière, and the music of Domenico Scarlatti (played by Bergman’s fourth wife, Käbi Laretei) underscores the joy that invests much of the film.


THE MAGICIAN
ANSIKTET
1958, Janus Films, 101 min, Sweden, Dir: Ingmar Bergman

This engaging, brilliantly conceived tale of deceit from one of cinema’s premier illusionists stars Max von Sydow as Dr. Vogler, a 19th-century traveling mesmerist and peddler of potions, whose magic is put to the test in Stockholm by the cruel, eminently rational royal medical adviser Dr. Vergérus. The result is a diabolically clever battle of wits that’s both frightening and funny, shot in rich, gorgeously gothic black-and-white.


SONS OF THE DESERT
1933, 65 min, USA, Dir: William A. Seiter

To attend a convention in Chicago of their fraternal organization, the Sons of the Desert, Stan and Ollie lie to their wives - but their cover story soon falls apart. Laurel and Hardy fans adopted the name of this feature for their organization, and many would cite it as the duo’s best; it was selected for preservation in the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry in 2012. Costarring Charley Chase.


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