DRIVE, HE SAID
1971, Sony Repertory, 90 min, USA, Dir: Jack Nicholson

Jack Nicholson’s first trip behind the camera as director is a subtle character study about basketball, college and Vietnam. It stands as one of the best sports-related movies ever made and captures the true feeling of the late ’60s/early ’70s college experience. William Tepper is a star basketball player with a drug-addled best friend (Michael Margotta) who is dodging the draft and a faculty-wife girlfriend (Karen Black) bent on giving him the boot. Bruce Dern's performance as the snide, take-no-prisoners coach is masterfully hard-nosed. With Robert Towne and Henry Jaglom in prime supporting roles, and cinematography by Bill Butler. "Nicholson deftly illustrates the background cynicism of big-time sports against the more obvious cynicism of college life." – Variety.


SMILE
1975, Park Circus/MGM, 117 min, USA, Dir: Michael Ritchie

Director Michael Ritchie’s savage, Norman Rockwell-in-rehab comedy stars Bruce Dern, Barbara Feldon (“Get Smart”), Michael Kidd and Geoffrey Lewis as a group of civic boosters desperately trying to stage a teenage beauty pageant in Santa Rosa, California. Annette O’Toole and Melanie Griffith are among the gorgeous, devious and very un-ladylike contestants in this wickedly funny snapshot of the underbelly of mid-’70s America.


THE MAGIC FLUTE
TROLLFLÖJTEN
1974, Janus Films, 134 min, Sweden, Dir: Ingmar Bergman

Director Ingmar Bergman shot Mozart's last operatic masterpiece for Swedish television in 1973, all on a studio lot in which the famed 18th-century Royal Court Theatre of Drottningholm was re-created. A heroic prince (Josef Köstlinger) has been enlisted by the Queen of the Night (Birgit Nordin) to rescue her daughter, the beautiful Pamina (Irma Urrila), from her evil father, Sarastro (Ulrik Cold). The music is sublime, and the film is stunning to look at with gorgeous cinematography by Bergman favorite Sven Nykvist. “THE MAGIC FLUTE is magical indeed, charming and musically fulfilling, a perfect commingling of one form of art and another.” - Charles Champlin, Los Angeles Times.


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