LITTLE BY LITTLE
PETIT À PETIT
1970, Icarus Films, 92 min, France/Niger, Dir: Jean Rouch

The most cutting of Rouch's collaborative ethno-fictions, this playful satire of European-African relations follows Nigeriens Damoure Zika and Lam Ibrahim, who had formed an import-export company at the end of the director’s JAGUAR three years earlier. As their enterprise, “Little By Little,” expands, the two travel to France for business advice, where they fall into their own version of contemporary European life and recruit some unlikely workers.


THE MOUSE THAT ROARED
1959, Sony Repertory, 83 min, UK, Dir: Jack Arnold

“The Hilarious Story of How the Duchy of Grand Fenwick Waged War on the U.S. - and Won!” Jack Arnold (THE CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON) may have seemed a strange choice to helm this satirical comedy about a tiny nation going to war with America to lose, then reap massive foreign aid, but he succeeds beautifully. Peter Sellers riotously pulls off one of his first stabs at multiple roles, portraying Grand Duchess Gloriana, Minister Count Rupert Mountjoy and Tully Bascombe. Costarring Jean Seberg, Leo McKern and David Kossoff. “…nicely done and often hilarious.” – Don Druker, The Chicago Reader.


STIR CRAZY
1980, Sony Repertory, 108 min, USA, Dir: Sidney Poitier

Directed by Sidney Poitier (star of LILIES OF THE FIELD and IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT), this classic comedy pairs Gene Wilder and Richard Pryor, whose chemistry and improvisation make this one of the most quotable films of all time. Struggling playwright Wilder and struggling actor Pryor head West to seek their fortune. Framed for a bank robbery they didn’t commit and sentenced to 125 years in jail, the two must appear in a prison rodeo in order to escape. Also features POLTERGEIST’s Craig T. Nelson and JoBeth Williams. “Yea, that’s right! That’s right! We bad!”


Syndicate content