GUMMO
1997, Warner Bros. , 89 min, Dir: Harmony Korine

With strains of his nihilistic youth-culture script for Larry Clark’s KIDS, Harmony Korine’s directorial debut moves out of the city to wander the post-apocalyptic fallout of a suburban Midwestern landscape recently ravaged by a tornado. Weaving between the day-to-day lives of various poverty-stricken small-town outcasts, GUMMO’s scattershot structure and varied shooting styles present a collage of American themes on the precipice of an unpredictable new millennium, ultimately yielding a movie that Gus Van Sant called “both bracingly realistic and hauntingly dreamlike.”


CONFIDENTIALLY YOURS
VIVEMENT DIMANCHE!
1983, Janus Films, 110 min, Dir: François Truffaut

In François Truffaut’s delightfully entertaining tribute to Hitchcock, a businessman (Jean-Louis Trintingnant) is wrongly accused of murder, and while he goes on the lam his secretary (Fanny Ardant) tries to find the real killer. Gorgeous black-and-white photography by Nestor Almendros and a witty screenplay (by Truffaut and frequent collaborators Suzanne Schiffman and Jean Aurel, adapting hardboiled American writer Charles Williams’ The Long Saturday Night) make this one of the director’s most enjoyable efforts.


ANNIE
1982, Sony Repertory, 126 min, Dir: John Huston

Young hotheaded orphan Annie (Aileen Quinn) is rescued from a cruel orphanage by a wealthy industrialist, Oliver Warbucks (the wonderful Albert Finney), but the wicked orphanage supervisor (Carol Burnett) tries to profit from the situation. A family musical with lots of movement, color, dance and music with sumptuous production numbers.


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