A NIGHT AT THE OPERA
1935, Warner Bros., 96 min, Dir: Sam Wood

The Marx Brothers' first film for MGM – also their first without Zeppo and their biggest box office hit – finds them in the mix with a couple of beleaguered opera-singer pals who are having career trouble. Enjoy the stateroom scene, the contract routine and tons of great one-liners. And remember: "There ain't no sanity clause!" Numerous writers (many uncredited) include George S. Kaufman and even Buster Keaton. With Kitty Carlisle, Allan Jones, Sig
Ruman and Margaret Dumont.


A DAY AT THE RACES
1937, Warner Bros., 111 min, Dir: Sam Wood

The Marx Brothers’ second (and most expensive) MGM film serves up Groucho as Dr. Hugo Z. Hackenbush, who arouses all sorts of suspicion as the new head of a posh sanitarium - and with good reason: He’s actually a veterinarian! Includes the celebrated "tootsie-fruitsie" and examination routines, plus a tremendous cast including Maureen O’Sullivan, Allan Jones, Douglass Dumbrille, Sig Ruman, Esther Muir and, of course, Margaret Dumont.


THE MAN WHO CAME TO DINNER
1942, Warner Brothers, 112 min, Dir: William Keighley

In this wonderful comedy Monty Woolley is an acid-tongued New York critic and radio commentator who breaks his leg after slipping on ice in front of an upper-class Ohio family’s home. Forced to remain immobile while he recuperates, he takes over the household during the holidays, bringing in his secretary (Bette Davis) who promptly falls for a local newspaperman (Richard Travis). When Woolley begins to realize he may lose his prized assistant, he calls in sexy actress friend Ann Sheridan to put the moves on the object of Davis’ affection. With some poisonously funny dialogue and a sterling supporting cast, including Billie Burke, Jimmy Durante, Reginald Gardiner and Mary Wickes.


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