MONTY PYTHON’S THE MEANING OF LIFE
1983, Universal, 107 min, UK, Dir: Terry Jones

This Grand Prix winner at the Cannes Film Festival includes a first look at Terry Gilliam (BRAZIL, 12 MONKEYS)’s innovative directorial style with the gorgeously surreal opening short “Crimson Permanent Assurance.” Pushing comedy boundaries to the extreme, the cast of Monty Python sing, dance and vomit their way into retirement. Featuring, without a doubt, the greatest musical number about birth control in film history.


LA DOLCE VITA
1960, Paramount, 185 min, Italy, Dir: Federico Fellini

Director Federico Fellini feels his way from the neo-realist past to the illusory future in this incredible emotional travelogue of the soul of modern Rome. How better to open the free-wheeling 1960s than with this alternately funny, feral, sweet and seductive meditation on what is truly meaningful (if anything) for the dusk-to-dawn Italian jet set? Marcello Mastroianni was catapulted into superstar status as the sensitive tabloid reporter juggling the affections of several women (voluptuous movie star Anita Ekberg, icy mistress Anouk Aimee and neurotic girlfriend Magali Noel) while making the rounds of the spirit-destroying nightlife of the Via Veneto. Mastroianni’s scene with Ekberg in the Trevi Fountain at dawn remains one of the most timeless, memorable images ever to emerge from world cinema. "I feel that decadence is indispensable to rebirth." - Fellini. In Italian with English subtitles.


MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL
1975, Rainbow Releasing, 91 min, UK, Dir: Terry Gilliam, Terry Jones

Python's $250,000 epic features Graham Chapman as King Arthur, John Cleese as Sir Lancelot the Brave and Eric Idle as Sir Robin the Not-Quite-So-Brave-as-Sir-Lancelot. From the limb-impaired Black Knight, to the immortal Knights who say Ni, killer rabbits, the Black Beast of Aarrgghh and the extremely rude Frenchman, HOLY GRAIL is one of the most beloved and quoted cult classics.


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