AUNTIE MAME
1958, Warner Bros., 143 min, Dir: Morton DaCosta

Rosalind Russell is in fine form as the jet-setting, Park Avenue aunt who suddenly becomes guardian to her young nephew. Free-spirited Mame takes the boy on irreverent escapades through the bohemian 1920s, the ravages of the Great Depression, the tribulations of her many loves and her plea for social justice. "Live! Life's a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death!" - Auntie Mame.


THE MIRACLE OF MORGAN'S CREEK
1944, Paramount, 98 min, Dir: Preston Sturges

Betty Hutton plays a World War II-era party girl who has a little too much fun while out with a soldier one night; when morning comes, she’s pregnant with only a vague memory of what happened. Writer-director Preston Sturges’ cheerfully eccentric riff on the Nativity story is as hilarious and inventive as anything he ever did, and astonishingly risqué for a Production Code-era film. Sturges regulars Eddie Bracken and William Demarest join Hutton in this comedy classic. [35mm]


SULLIVAN’S TRAVELS
1941, Universal, 98 min, Dir: Preston Sturges

Director Preston Sturges’ most acclaimed comedy is something like a social-realist movie with a wicked sense of humor. Successful Hollywood director Joel McCrea grows weary of making "entertainment pictures" and decides to hit the road disguised as a hobo to research his first "serious" film. A roller-coaster of mishaps and coincidences lands him on a chain gang, as well as in the arms of lovely Veronica Lake, before he learns what audiences crave the most.


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