PEGGY SUE GOT MARRIED
1986, Sony Repertory, 103 min, USA, Dir: Francis Ford Coppola

Kathleen Turner earned an Oscar nomination in the title role as a recently separated housewife who attends her high school reunion only to be transported a quarter-century back in time to her senior year. As she revisits the events that shaped the course of her life and considers changing them, Peggy Sue’s future husband (Nicolas Cage) tries to convince her of his love. This touching romantic comedy features a strong supporting cast including up-and-comers Jim Carrey, Joan Allen and Helen Hunt as well as veteran performers Maureen O'Sullivan and John Carradine.


BLACK PETER
CERNÝ PETR
1964, Janus Films, 85 min, Czechoslovakia, Dir: Milos Forman

Shot on a low budget with non-professional actors, Milos Forman’s feature debut displays the sly humor and naturalism that put the director at the forefront of the Czech new wave of the 1960s. With his father constantly badgering him, 16-year-old Petr (Ladislav Jakim) trades a summer hanging out with friends for a job as a supermarket trainee - where his primary duty is to spy on the customers and prevent shoplifting.


LOVES OF A BLONDE
LÁSKY JEDNÉ PLAVOVLÁSKY
1965, Janus Films, 82 min, Czechoslovakia, Dir: Milos Forman

With 16 women to each man, the odds are against Andula in her desperate search for love - that is, until a rakish piano player visits her small factory town and temporarily eases her longings. A tender and humorous look at Andula’s journey, from the first pangs of romance to its inevitable disappointments, LOVES OF A BLONDE immediately became a classic of the Czech New Wave and earned Milos Forman the first of his Academy Award nominations.


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