THE GREAT ZIEGFELD
1936, Warner Bros., 176 min, USA, Dir: Robert Z. Leonard

In this epic, spectacular fictionalized biography of Florenz “Flo” Ziegfeld (William Powell) with original music by Walter Donaldson and Irving Berlin, we follow the rise and fall of an irrepressibly ambitious businessman as he relentlessly cultivates stars and ultimately creates the glamorous, leggy Ziegfeld Follies. With breathlessly lavish production numbers that define the grandeur of the 1930s MGM musical, THE GREAT ZIEGFELD must be seen on the big screen! With Luise Rainer, Myrna Loy, Fanny Brice, Virginia Bruce and Ray Bolger.


DANTON
1983, Janus Films, 136 min, France, Poland, West Germany, Dir: Andrzej Wajda

Directed by Andrzej Wajda while in exile, the Polish filmmaker's French-language debut is an adaptation of "The Danton Affair," written in the 1920s by Communist playwright Stanislawa Przybyszewska. After the French Revolution, Paris suffers under the Reign of Terror as the government of the ruthless Maximilien de Robespierre (Wojciech Pszoniak) intimidates all opponents. Georges Danton (Gérard Depardieu), former friend of the leader, seeks an end to the bloodshed and, joined by Camille Desmoulins (writer-director Patrice Chéreau in his first acting role), attempts to bring peace to the streets of the capital. For his efforts, Danton is imprisoned, and awaits the guillotine with steely resolve. In French with English subtitles. "I do not know of any play or movie that has ever come so close to suggesting the fascinating complexity of the French Revolution." - Andrew Sarris, Village Voice


BARABBAS
1961, Sony Repertory, 137 min, Italy, Dir: Richard Fleischer

Closer in spirit to Scorsese’s THE LAST TEMPTATION OF CHRIST than to the biblical epics of its own day, director Richard Fleischer’s visually stunning drama (shot in Technirama 70) about the thief (Anthony Quinn) given amnesty in place of Jesus is a moving, gritty and harrowingly unsentimental odyssey of one lonely unfortunate’s spiritual evolution. With Silvana Mangano, Ernest Borgnine and Jack Palance.


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