GOOD MORNING VIETNAM
1987, Walt Disney Pictures, 121 min, USA, Dir: Barry Levinson

Delivering dialogue that was frequently improvised, Robin Williams earned his first Oscar nomination as Armed Forces Radio Service DJ Adrian Cronauer, whose freewheeling mix of hits of the day and rapid-fire commentary ruffled military feathers in Saigon during the Vietnam War. Given the setting, there’s drama as well as comedy, plus lots of great music; the film’s platinum-selling soundtrack put Louis Armstrong’s “What a Wonderful World” back on the charts. Costarring Forest Whitaker and Bruno Kirby.


BONNIE AND CLYDE
1967, Warner Bros., 111 min, USA, Dir: Arthur Penn

Arthur Penn’s New Hollywood masterpiece follows the criminal exploits of Bonnie Parker (Faye Dunaway), Clyde Barrow (Warren Beatty) and the rest of the Barrow gang in the Depression-era Midwest. With Gene Hackman, Michael J. Pollard, Gene Wilder and Estelle Parsons (a Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner as Blanche Barrow).


CONFESSIONS OF A DANGEROUS MIND
2002, Park Circus/Miramax, 115 min, USA, Dir: George Clooney

At the height of his career as a television game show producer, Chuck Barris (a revelatory Sam Rockwell) finds himself being followed by a suspicious character who recruits him for secretive and dangerous service as a CIA operative. As he basks in the glamour of his two worlds, Barris’ double life soon begins to spiral out of control. Adapted by Charlie Kaufman from the real Chuck Barris’ “unauthorized autobiography,” this bizarre tale gets a unique visual treatment from production designer James Bissell, who employs what might be called a “neo-hallucinogenic” color palette as well as a number of mind-bending pre-CG cinematic techniques.


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