WON’T YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR?
2018, Focus Features, 94 min, USA, Dir: Morgan Neville

For more than 30 years, an unassuming minister, puppeteer, writer and producer was beamed daily into homes across America. In his beloved television program, “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood,” Fred Rogers and his cast of puppets and friends spoke directly to young children about some of life’s weightiest issues in a simple, direct fashion. In this engaging, moving documentary, Academy Award-winning filmmaker Morgan Neville (TWENTY FEET FROM STARDOM) looks back on the legacy of the soft-spoken, cardigan-clad TV host, focusing on his radically kind ideas and belief in the importance of protecting childhood. "A really good movie. ... It’s like a security blanket for our troubled times." - Chris Nashawaty, Entertainment Weekly


FIRST MAN
2018, Universal, 141 min, USA/Japan, Dir: Damien Chazelle

Oscar-winning director Damien Chazelle reteams with LA LA LAND star Ryan Gosling for the riveting story behind the first manned mission to the moon, focusing on Neil Armstrong and the decade leading to the historic Apollo 11 flight. Based on the book by James R. Hansen, this visceral and intimate account is told from Armstrong’s perspective, exploring the triumphs and the cost - to the astronaut, his family, his colleagues and the nation itself - of one of the most dangerous missions in history. With Claire Foy. "Damien Chazelle’s sweeping and intimate new film ... takes the conquest of difficulty as both theme and inspiration." - A.O. Scott, New York Times


CAN YOU EVER FORGIVE ME?
2018, Fox Searchlight, 106 min, USA, Dir: Marielle Heller

Melissa McCarthy stars in the adaptation of the memoir CAN YOU EVER FORGIVE ME?, the true story of best-selling celebrity biographer (and friend to cats) Lee Israel, who made her living in the 1970s and '80s profiling the likes of Katharine Hepburn, Tallulah Bankhead, Estee Lauder and journalist Dorothy Kilgallen. When Lee is no longer able to get published because she has fallen out of step with current tastes, she turns her art form to deception, abetted by her loyal friend Jack (Richard E. Grant). “It is a fiercely composed, historically informed, and richly textured film, as insightful regarding the particularities of the protagonist as it is on the artistic life - and on the life of its times.” - Richard Brody, The New Yorker.


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