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TWICE UPON A TIME
1983, Warner Bros., 75 min, USA, Dir: John Korty, Charles Swenson

In the city of Din, the Rushers work all day, the Figmen deliver sweet dreams all night, and the Murkworks try to muck up everyone’s fun by dropping nightmare bombs on the slumbering masses. When the leader of the Figmen is kidnapped, eternal screw-ups Ralph and Mumford can save the day and prove themselves unlikely heroes if they just shut down the Cosmic Clock and stop time long enough to rescue the hostage. Easy enough … now if they could just figure out how to get the Cosmic Clock started again! Executive produced by George Lucas, TWICE UPON A TIME is a radical collage of animation styles and live action footage unlike anything you’ve ever seen.


A BOY NAMED CHARLIE BROWN
1969, CineLife Entertainment, 86 min, USA, Dir: Bill Melendez

The Peanuts gang makes its big-screen debut in this gentle comedy about success, failure and resilience. After a Little League baseball loss, Charlie Brown fears he’ll never win at anything - until Linus encourages him to enter the school spelling bee, putting him on the path to the national championship in New York City. The creative team of Bill Melendez and Lee Mendelson gives this animated hit a similar feel to their classic TV specials (though a late-1960s visual style crops up occasionally), and jazz pianist Vince Guaraldi earned an Oscar nomination for the score.


RATATOUILLE
2007, Walt Disney Pictures, 111 min, USA, Dir: Brad Bird, Jan Pinkava

This Oscar winner for Best Animated Feature follows Remy (voiced by Patton Oswalt), a rodent who dreams of becoming a top chef. Remy gets his chance by teaming up with a garbage boy at famed Paris restaurant Gusteau's, but he must be careful – rats are killed if caught in the kitchen. A voice cast including Ian Holm, Janeane Garofalo, Brian Dennehy and Peter O'Toole serves up a banquet of delicious performances. “A nearly flawless piece of popular art, as well as one of the most persuasive portraits of an artist ever committed to film.” - A.O. Scott, The New York Times.


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