A BOY NAMED CHARLIE BROWN
1969, CineLife Entertainment, 86 min, USA, Dir: Bill Melendez

The Peanuts gang makes its big-screen debut in this gentle comedy about success, failure and resilience. After a Little League baseball loss, Charlie Brown fears he’ll never win at anything - until Linus encourages him to enter the school spelling bee, putting him on the path to the national championship in New York City. The creative team of Bill Melendez and Lee Mendelson gives this animated hit a similar feel to their classic TV specials (though a late-1960s visual style crops up occasionally), and jazz pianist Vince Guaraldi earned an Oscar nomination for the score.


RATATOUILLE
2007, Walt Disney Pictures, 111 min, USA, Dir: Brad Bird, Jan Pinkava

This Oscar winner for Best Animated Feature follows Remy (voiced by Patton Oswalt), a rodent who dreams of becoming a top chef. Remy gets his chance by teaming up with a garbage boy at famed Paris restaurant Gusteau's, but he must be careful – rats are killed if caught in the kitchen. A voice cast including Ian Holm, Janeane Garofalo, Brian Dennehy and Peter O'Toole serves up a banquet of delicious performances. “A nearly flawless piece of popular art, as well as one of the most persuasive portraits of an artist ever committed to film.” - A.O. Scott, The New York Times.


INCREDIBLES 2
2018, Walt Disney Pictures, 115 min, USA, Dir: Brad Bird

In this animated action-adventure, Helen (Holly Hunter) is called on to lead a campaign to bring Supers back, while Bob (Craig T. Nelson) navigates the day-to-day heroics of “normal” life at home with Violet (Sarah Vowell), Dash (Huck Milner) and baby Jack-Jack - whose superpowers are about to be discovered. Their mission is derailed, however, when a new villain emerges with a brilliant and dangerous plot that threatens everything. But the Parrs don’t shy away from a challenge, especially with Frozone (Samuel L. Jackson) by their side. That’s what makes this family so incredible.


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