WOLF’S HOLE
VLCI BOUDA
1987, 92 min, Czechoslovakia, Dir: Věra Chytilová

In writer-director Věra Chytilová’s subversive spin on 1980s sci-fi/horror, a group of teenagers are invited to a skiing workshop at an isolated lodge, where their camp counselors seem bent on pitting them against one another. Political overtones of the Czech normalization period are certainly present, though genre fans will likely be too spellbound by the mounting psychological terror to notice. Aided by inventive camera work and a standout performance from Radka Slavíková as teen Emilka, WOLF’S HOLE is sure to get under your skin.


THE YOUNG AND PRODIGIOUS T.S. SPIVET
2013, The Weinstein Company, 105 min, France/Canada, Dir: Jean-Pierre Jeunet

This beguiling big-screen adaptation of Reif Larsen’s popular novel follows Tecumseh Sparrow Spivet (Kyle Catlett), a 10-year-old inventor who travels on his own from his family’s Montana home to Washington, D.C. to accept a prize from the Smithsonian Institution. Helena Bonham Carter and Judy Davis costar in the film, which earned a César Award winner for best cinematography. “THE YOUNG AND PRODIGIOUS T.S. SPIVET is the perfect 3-D vehicle and Jeunet takes full advantage, offering a feast of amusing visual flourishes suited to the book's playfulness.” - Jay Weissberg, Variety.


BIG FISH
2003, Sony Pictures, 120 min, Dir: Tim Burton

In the heartwarming BIG FISH, director Tim Burton brings his inimitable imagination on a journey that delves deep into a fabled relationship between a father and his son. Edward Bloom (Albert Finney) has always been a teller of tall-tales about his oversized life as a young man (Ewan McGregor), when his wanderlust led him on an unlikely journey from a small-town in Alabama, around the world and back again. His mythic exploits dart from the delightful to the delirious as he weaves epic tales about giants, blizzards, a witch and conjoined-twin lounge singers. With his larger-than-life stories, Bloom charms almost everyone he encounters except his estranged son, Will (Billy Crudup). When his mother (Jessica Lange) tries to reunite them, Will must learn how to separate fact from fiction as he comes to terms with his father's great feats and great failings.


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