WHO KILLED CAPTAIN ALEX?
2010, AGFA, 64 min, Uganda, Dir: Nabwana I.G.G.

Welcome to Wakaliwood, Uganda, home of vanguards of DIY commando cinema writer-producer-director Nabwana Isaac Godfrey Geoffrey (IGG) and producer-star Alan Ssali Hofmanis. This crack crew of self-taught filmmakers and martial arts aficionados produce dozens of gonzo action films in the Kampala ghetto with budgets that rarely exceed $200. “WHO KILLED CAPTAIN ALEX? features Ugandan commandos, kung fu, a MIDI version of Seal’s ‘Kiss From a Rose,’ a rambunctious (and sometimes farting) in-film commentary track, and some more supa action. It’s a bat-shit crazy milestone to be honored in the film history books.” - Nick Allen, The Film Stage.


THE 10TH VICTIM
LA DECIMA VITTIMA
1965, Rialto Pictures, 92 min, Italy/France, Dir: Elio Petri

Decades before THE HUNGER GAMES or even THE RUNNING MAN, humans killed other humans for entertainment in THE 10TH VICTIM. This Carlo Ponti production is set in a world where war is virtually unknown, as violent people work out their aggression in the “Big Hunt.” Wealth and celebrity awaits anyone who can survive five rounds as a hunter and five as prey; original Bond girl Ursula Andress holds the shotgun here, with bleached-blond Marcello Mastroianni in her sights. As sharp as the leads look in this lively sci-fi satire, it’s Piero Poletto’s groovy-futuristic production design that truly dazzles.


THE YOUNG AND PRODIGIOUS T.S. SPIVET
2013, The Weinstein Company, 105 min, France/Canada, Dir: Jean-Pierre Jeunet

This beguiling big-screen adaptation of Reif Larsen’s popular novel follows Tecumseh Sparrow Spivet (Kyle Catlett), a 10-year-old inventor who travels on his own from his family’s Montana home to Washington, D.C. to accept a prize from the Smithsonian Institution. Helena Bonham Carter and Judy Davis costar in the film, which earned a César Award winner for best cinematography. “THE YOUNG AND PRODIGIOUS T.S. SPIVET is the perfect 3-D vehicle and Jeunet takes full advantage, offering a feast of amusing visual flourishes suited to the book's playfulness.” - Jay Weissberg, Variety.


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