PERDITA DURANGO
DANCE WITH THE DEVIL
1997, 129 min, Mexico/Spain, Dir: Álex de la Iglesia

Álex de la Iglesia's first English-language feature stars Rosie Perez as Perdita Durango, whose trip to Mexico is sidelined by all-purpose felon Romeo Dolorosa (Javier Bardem). Perdita's new beau traffics human fetuses to Las Vegas where they're turned into cosmetics; naturally they need a couple of human sacrifices to do the job right. But nothing goes according to plan as law enforcement and Dolorosa's underworld associates converge on the pair. Shocking, satirical and action-packed, this road movie offers plenty for Perez and Bardem to sink their teeth into, and they're supported by a great cast including James Gandolfini, Screamin' Jay Hawkins and Santiago Segura.


THE DAY OF THE BEAST
EL DÍA DE LA BESTIA
1995, 99 min, Spain/Italy, Dir: Álex de la Iglesia

Two-thousand years after the birth of Christ, the Anti-Christ is about to be born - unless Father Ángel Berriartúa (Álex Angulo) can stop it. The Basque priest believes he can prevent the apocalypse by infiltrating the ranks of the devil, though that will require him to trade in his pious life for one of non-stop sin. Aided by a heavy metal fan (Santiago Segura) and an occult TV show host (Armando De Razza), Ángel raises hell through Madrid as Christmas Eve - and the possible end of the world - approaches in Álex de la Iglesia's wickedly funny cult classic.


ARCHENEMY
2020, 90 min, Dir: Adam Egypt Mortimer

Adam Egypt Mortimer (DANIEL ISN’T REAL) is back to astonish us with a twisted, utterly unique take on comic book superheroes. Max Fist (Joe Manganiello) is an intergalactic defender of worlds and vanquisher of evil … until a hapless accident propels him through space and time to Earth, rendering him stranded and his powers useless. Hamster is a kid from the wrong side of the tracks trying to realize his dream of becoming a popular social media storyteller with the support of his protective sister Indigo, who works for a local gang. It’s not too long before their paths cross with Max’s, and when they do, there’s no telling what might happen. Riffing on familiar comic book-adaptation tropes, Mortimer’s film is a breath of fresh air that skewers our expectations; nihilistic humor collides with relatable characters in a universe reflective of the times we live in to create the sort of superhero we didn’t know we needed. – Evrim Ersoy


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