TRUE ROMANCE
1993, Morgan Creek, 120 min, USA, Dir: Tony Scott

Director Tony Scott and screenwriter Quentin Tarantino collaborate for a characteristically over-the-top, stylishly haywire crime romance, following the explosive marriage of comic store clerk Clarence (Christian Slater) and prostitute Alabama (Patricia Arquette), who inherit a suitcase of cocaine on their wedding day. When the couple tries to sell the drugs, a slew of Hollywood’s hardest and most flamboyant gangsters (including Christopher Walken, James Gandolfini and Gary Oldham) starts gunning for the star-crossed lovers. With an estimable and delightfully tweaked-out supporting cast headed by Dennis Hopper, Val Kilmer, Brad Pitt and Samuel L. Jackson.


THE HUNGER
1983, Warner Bros., 97 min, USA, Dir: Tony Scott

Twenty years before anyone had ever heard of TWILIGHT, director Tony Scott was bringing impossibly glamorous bloodsuckers to the big screen. Catherine Deneuve and David Bowie star as a pair of upscale New York vampires who draw geriatrics researcher Susan Sarandon into their circle when age begins to catch up with one of them. “I must say, there's nothing that looks like it on the market,” remarked Bowie on release, and the film's rich sense of atmosphere inspired a cult following and a TV series. Watch closely for a performance by goth music icons Bauhaus, and one of Willem Dafoe's first movie roles.


DAYS OF THUNDER
1990, Paramount, 107 min, USA, Dir: Tony Scott

Do you feel the need for speed? The TOP GUN team of producers Don Simpson and Jerry Bruckheimer, director Tony Scott and star Tom Cruise reunited for this high-octane drama set in the world of auto racing. Cruise plays a hot-shot rookie recruited to drive for a NASCAR team under the tutelage of Robert Duvall; Nicole Kidman plays a doctor who falls in love with the young racer after a crash (the sparks flew in real life as well - Cruise and Kidman married shortly after the film premiered). Robert Towne penned the screenplay to this huge hit, which also features Michael Rooker, Randy Quaid, and Cary Elwes.


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