PEE WEE’S BIG ADVENTURE
1985, Warner Bros., 90 min, USA, Dir: Tim Burton

The Eighties were precarious. If you weren’t careful you could be forced to feel sorry for the yuppie ratsticks in WALL STREET or find yourself actually rooting for egomaniacal Jerry Lewis to free himself in KING OF COMEDY. But the decade triumphantly launched PEE WEE’S BIG ADVENTURE, the movie that lionizes the 90lb weakling and propelled Tim Burton and Danny Elfman into the goth cinematic darkosphere. Part-caper, part-road movie PEE WEE is an homage inside a tour-de-france with every kitsch genre mined to full potential. The story of a lovable weirdling (Paul Reubens) who lives alone with just his beloved bicycle. When the bike gets stolen Pee Dub rightly suspects his bratty neighbor Francis (Mark Holton), but Francis has paid a thug to ditch the bike and the chase is on all the way to the basement of the Alamo. Drunken bikers, a ghostly lady trucker and Godzilla all show up with madcap consequences. EIGHTIES WARNING: this movie contains James Brolin being ironically hilarious. No one will be seated during Twisted Sister.


BIG EYES
2014, The Weinstein Company, 106 min, USA, Dir: Tim Burton

Director Tim Burton reteams with ED WOOD screenwriters Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski for an insightful look at another outsider artist. Margaret Keane (Amy Adams) painted portraits of children with huge, doleful eyes that became famous in the 1960s – after her husband Walter (Christoph Waltz) attached his name to the works and mass-marketed them. Jason Schwartzman, Krysten Ritter and Terence Stamp costar in this colorful portrait of a woman not content to stand silently behind her man.


CORPSE BRIDE
2005, Warner Bros., 77 min, USA, Dir: Tim Burton, Mike Johnson

Inspired by a Jewish folktale, this gothic animated fantasy stars Johnny Depp as Victor Van Dort, a shy young man engaged to Victoria Everglot (Emily Watson). After flubbing his lines at the wedding rehearsal, he goes to the forest to practice them - and accidentally marries a woman buried there (Helena Bonham Carter). Tim Burton’s third stop-motion feature and first as a director also features the voices of Tracey Ullman, Albert Finney and Christopher Lee, and the music of Danny Elfman (who plays Bonejangles in the film).


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