THE LONG GOODBYE
1973, Park Circus/MGM, 112 min, USA, Dir: Robert Altman

Robert Altman deconstructs the private-eye genre while somehow remaining faithful to the spirit of the original Raymond Chandler novel (aided by screenwriter Leigh Brackett, who helped adapt Howard Hawks’ THE BIG SLEEP). Elliott Gould is a smart-aleck, slightly inept Philip Marlowe, a detective seemingly more concerned about feeding a cat than solving a case. He gets drawn into a labyrinth of deceptions and double crosses by friend Terry Lennox (Jim Bouton), a beautiful rich woman (Nina Van Pallandt) with a drunken, genius writer of a husband (Sterling Hayden in a tour de force portrayal), a quietly menacing psychiatrist (Henry Gibson) and a sociopathic gangster (Mark Rydell). Altman rips aside the slick veneer of the Southern California good life, revealing the smog-drenched, corrupt underbelly like few other directors before or since.


SHORT CUTS
1993, Warner Bros., 187 min, USA, Dir: Robert Altman

Working from short stories by Raymond Carver, director Robert Altman creates a funny, tragic and wholly original portrait of Southern Californians whose lives intersect in surprising ways. The cast is one of Altman's best: Matthew Modine, Julianne Moore, Buck Henry, Lily Tomlin, Tom Waits, Andie MacDowell, Jack Lemmon, Lili Taylor and Robert Downey Jr. are just a few of the stars in this masterpiece.


MASH
1970, 20th Century Fox, 116 min, USA, Dir: Robert Altman

Director Robert Altman’s breakout film defines black comedy and the pushing-the-envelope, pioneering spirit then blossoming in the New Hollywood of the 1970s. Donald Sutherland and Elliott Gould are hilarious as Hawkeye Pierce and Trapper John, newly arrived surgeons at the 4077th MASH unit located in a Korean War battle zone. They’re anarchic spirits with no patience for hypocrisy, bureaucracy or stupidity. Timeless, with a dream cast of standout performers, including Robert Duvall, Sally Kellerman and Tom Skerritt.


Syndicate content