WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO BABY JANE?
1962, Warner Bros., 134 min, USA, Dir: Robert Aldrich

Forget about its reputation as a camp classic; this first-rate study of the most dysfunctional siblings in cinema history is a classic, period. Bette Davis is unforgettable as a washed-up child star who passes the time by torturing her invalid sister Joan Crawford, and Robert Aldrich's direction crosses horror with film noir to create one of the most chilling yet darkly comic masterpieces of all time. With the great, underrated Victor Buono in probably his most memorable role (he was Oscar-nominated as supporting actor, as was Davis, for actress).


ULZANA’S RAID
1972, Universal, 103 min, USA, Dir: Robert Aldrich

When Ulzana (Joaquin Martinez) and a small band of Apaches escape from an Arizona reservation and begin killing settlers, a green cavalry lieutenant (Bruce Davison) is assigned to capture them with the help of a veteran scout (Burt Lancaster). The desert pursuit that ensues is both a tense tactical game and an unflinching look at how ethnic conflicts brutalize both sides. An underrated Western, expertly directed by Robert Aldrich (THE DIRTY DOZEN) from Alan Sharp’s intricate screenplay.


THE DIRTY DOZEN
1967, Warner Bros., 149 min, USA, Dir: Robert Aldrich

Lee Marvin whips a group of unruly criminals (including John Cassavetes and Charles Bronson) into shape for a WWII suicide mission, and the result is an action epic that deals with issues of race, class and war in a massively entertaining context. Ernest Borgnine is an ornery general making Marvin’s life hell.


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