DOG EAT DOG
2016, RLJ Entertainment, 95 min, Dir: Paul Schrader

With two strikes against them, Mad Dog (Willem Dafoe), Troy (Nicolas Cage) and Diesel (Christopher Matthew Cook) don’t have a lot of options. So the three ex-cons are receptive when mobster Grecco the Greek (director Schrader) approaches them with a kidnapping scheme … but the potentially lucrative operation quickly spirals out of control. Adapting Edward Bunker’s seminal pulp underground classic, Schrader employs a gonzo, guerrilla approach to create this brilliantly funny, scattershot noir, which takes us to the underbelly of California with endless bloodbaths, morally corrupt characters and a sadistic sense of fun. “A thoroughly disreputable, sordid and engaging crime drama.” - Todd McCarthy, The Hollywood Reporter.


AMERICAN GIGOLO
1980, Paramount, 117 min, USA, Dir: Paul Schrader

Julian Kaye (Richard Gere) is a suave, Armani-clad prostitute embroiled in a steamy affair with a senator’s wife (Lauren Hutton) when he becomes the prime suspect in the murder of one of his previous clients. Helmed by RAGING BULL scribe Paul Schrader, this stylish, ’80s-chic crime drama is driven by Gere’s layered portrait of the vulnerable, hopelessly empty playboy. “Call Me,” the endlessly catchy Blondie theme song written for the film, is both a literal reference to the protagonist’s work as a callboy and an allusion to the brilliantly rendered, desperate yearning for human connection that underlies practically every relationship in this seminal film.


AUTO FOCUS
2002, Sony Pictures Classics, 105 min, USA, Dir: Paul Schrader

Greg Kinnear gives one of his finest performances as Bob Crane, the affable star of television's "Hogan's Heroes," in director Paul Schrader’s subversive Hollywood biopic. A savagely funny, ultimately tragic portrait of a likable celebrity who hides a sex addiction and an exhibitionistic streak - a streak that manifests itself in Crane's unusual friendship with John Carpenter (Willem Dafoe), an electronics enthusiast who records the duo's sexual escapades. As the men's relationship turns darker, Schrader's film grows more compelling.


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