MISHIMA: A LIFE IN FOUR CHAPTERS
1985, Janus Films, 121 min, USA/Japan, Dir: Paul Schrader

The tumultuous life of Japanese writer Yukio Mishima serves as the subject for what many consider director Paul Schrader’s masterpiece. To a score by Philip Glass, the film interweaves several narratives (each with its own distinctive look) drawn from Mishima’s youth, his novels and the attempted coup that ended in his ritual suicide. “The most unconventional biopic I've ever seen, and one of the best.” – Roger Ebert. In Japanese and English with English subtitles.


HARDCORE
1979, Sony Repertory, 109 min, USA, Dir: Paul Schrader

This underrated drama from writer-director Paul Schrader is anchored by one of George C. Scott’s greatest performances. He plays Jake Van Dorn, a conservative Midwestern businessman whose daughter disappears during a church-sponsored trip to California. Horrified to learn she may now be working in the L.A. porn industry, Van Dorn enlists a sleazy private investigator (Peter Boyle) and a wary streetwalker (Season Hubley) to find the girl.


CAT PEOPLE (1982)
1982, Universal, 118 min, USA, Dir: Paul Schrader

Director Paul Schrader adds a glossy ’80s eroticism to Jacques Tourneur’s ’40s horror classic about a race of people who turn into cats when sexually aroused. Nastassja Kinski travels to New Orleans to visit long-separated brother Malcolm McDowell, who goes missing right around the time a black panther attacks a prostitute. Giorgio Moroder’s synth-pop score includes the David Bowie hit “Cat People (Putting Out Fire).”


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