DON'T LOOK NOW
1973, Paramount, 110 min, Dir: Nicolas Roeg

Director Nicolas Roeg’s atmospheric adaptation of Daphne DuMaurier’s story is a haunting meditation on the consequences of repressing traits inside us that could mean the difference between life and death. Antiquities restorer Donald Sutherland and wife Julie Christie, in mourning after the accidental drowning of their young daughter, journey to Venice during the off-season to help renovate a church. But their encounter with two strange sisters, one of whom is a blind clairvoyant, pulls them into shadowy back alleys and deserted canals and onto the radar of a warped serial killer terrorizing the city. A brilliant variation on Italy’s homegrown giallothriller genre then enjoying success in early 1970s European cinema.


PERFORMANCE
1970, Warner Bros., 105 min, UK, Dir: Donald Cammell, Nicolas Roeg

Perhaps the wildest, most deeply layered psychedelic movie ever made. Gangster James Fox goes on the lam, hiding out in reclusive pop star Mick Jagger’s decaying townhouse in the hippie London ghetto. Jagger and polysexual pal Anita Pallenberg put Fox through his paces with mind games and large doses of psylocibin mushrooms - all climaxing in the mind-blowing “Memo for Turner” production number. Brutal beatings, sexual-identity crises and prodigious drug-taking are punctuated by one of Jack Nitzsche’s best scores (highlighted by Ry Cooder’s incredible bottleneck guitar work).


THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH
1976, Rialto Pictures, 139 min, UK, Dir: Nicolas Roeg

This stylish cult favorite stars rocker David Bowie (in his feature debut) as the exotic and mysterious Thomas Jerome Newton - an extraterrestrial hoping to save his drought-ravaged planet. With his advanced technology, Newton easily amasses wealth and power, but he has considerably more trouble dealing with human desires and fears. Enigmatic and beautiful, this is one of the most distinctive sci-fi films of the 1970s. Costarring Rip Torn, Candy Clark and Buck Henry.


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