THE SCARLET HOUR
1956, Paramount, 95 min, USA, Dir: Michael Curtiz

Nearing the end of his legendary career, Michael Curtiz produced and directed this intricately plotted L.A.-based crime thriller headed by a cast of new discoveries. A tony seductress (Carol Ohmart) and her lover (Tom Tryon) overhear plans for a jewel robbery, and believe the scheme will be their deliverance from Ohmart’s possessive husband (James Gregory). Highlights include a guest appearance by Nat King Cole singing “Never Let Me Go” in the Crystal Room of the Beverly Hills Hotel. Culled from the Paramount vault, this 35mm print remains one of the least seen film noirs of the 1950s, featuring Curtiz’s use of the then-new Fujinon camera lens. You’ll only see this at NOIR CITY!


THE BREAKING POINT
1950, Warner Bros., 97 min, USA, Dir: Michael Curtiz

The finest film version of Hemingway’s novel To Have and Have Not (and yes, that includes the Bogart-Hawks classic) shifts the story from Cuba to Newport Beach, California, but retains the novel’s core of noir-stained tragedy. As Skipper Harry Morgan, John Garfield essays his finest screen portrayal of a man whose domestic travails and mid-life crisis results in crime, flight and death. Garfield’s turn is perfectly matched by Patricia Neal, as a predatory femme fatale, and Phyllis Thaxter as his beaten-down but unswervingly loyal spouse. With Wallace Ford as a bottom-feeding attorney and the great Afro-Cuban actor Juano Hernandez.


THE SEA WOLF
1941, Warner Bros.,, 100 min, USA, Dir: Michael Curtiz

The definitive cinematic version of Jack London’s famed novel returns to the big screen. Edward G. Robinson’s magnificent portrayal of Wolf Larsen is the centerpiece of a darkly fatalistic tale adapted by Robert Rossen (ALL THE KING’S MEN, THE HUSTLER) who blends a distinctive anti-Nazi sentiment (initiated into American movies by the brothers Warner) with an unforgettable saga of tyranny at sea. An all-star cast of John Garfield, Ida Lupino, Gene Lockhart and Barry Fitzgerald add dramatic heft to Curtiz’s brilliantly helmed epic.


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