1976, Sony Repertory, 113 min, USA, Dir: Martin Scorsese

Director Martin Scorsese's "savage, many-headed dragon of the American New Wave" (Michael Atkinson, The Village Voice) is still as potent as ever. Cabbie Travis Bickle (Robert De Niro's seminal pistol-packing, insomniac loner) drives through the open sewer that is mid-1970s Manhattan with its pimps (Harvey Keitel), hookers (Jodie Foster), politicos (Cybill Shepherd and Albert Brooks) and other scummy creatures of the neon wilderness. With a ferocious script by Paul Schrader.

1986, Buena Vista Pictures, 119 min, USA, Dir: Martin Scorsese

Paul Newman took home a long overdue Best Actor Oscar for reprising his role as pool shark Fast Eddie Felson in this follow-up to 1961’s THE HUSTLER. Here Fast Eddie returns to the game to show a talented younger player (Tom Cruise) how to work the tables for money, and - in a final match between teacher and student - how to sink the shots that really count. With Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio.

1978, MGM Repertory, 117 min, USA, Dir: Martin Scorsese

"It Started as a Concert. It Became a Celebration. Now It's a Legend." On Thanksgiving Day 1976, 5,000 cheering fans gathered for the historic farewell concert of The Band. Martin Scorsese provides fascinating interviews with Band members, but the film's real hook is the stage show: A rotation of rock legends including Van Morrison, Joni Mitchell, Paul Butterfield, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton and Neil Young join The Band in one of the greatest concert films ever made.

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