ALICE DOESN'T LIVE HERE ANYMORE
1974, Warner Bros., 112 min, USA, Dir: Martin Scorsese

Ellen Burstyn won an Oscar for her performance as a widow and mother starting a new life in the American Southwest. This early Scorsese gem is a richly detailed character study in which Burstyn gets terrific support from Kris Kristofferson, Diane Ladd, Harvey Keitel and Jodie Foster.


WHO’S THAT KNOCKING AT MY DOOR
1967, Warner Bros., 90 min, USA, Dir: Martin Scorsese

Martin Scorsese took the filmmaking world by storm at the 1967 Chicago International Film Festival with this New York City-set drama that is steeped in cinema history while forging ahead towards something new. Shrouded in the fog of Catholic guilt which so informs his later films, WHO’S THAT KNOCKING AT MY DOOR is a haunting story of a young couples’ reckoning with a traumatizing event. Featuring the acting debut of Harvey Keitel, along with a memorable performance by Zina Bethune, the film, as critic Roger Ebert observed upon its premiere, was “absolutely genuine” and “a great moment in American movies.”


AFTER HOURS
1985, Warner Bros., 97 min, USA, Dir: Martin Scorsese

Manhattan becomes a surreal dreamscape of bizarre terror in Martin Scorsese's film about an ordinary guy (Griffin Dunne) who agrees to a late-night date with an attractive but alarmingly disturbed woman (Rosanna Arquette). Dead bodies, strange sculptresses and an incensed ice cream truck mob are all part of the protagonist's weird journey into the dark and neglected hours of the morning.


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